"shift"+"del" in Outlook, where do messages go????

  ChrisBnSueR 00:13 18 Apr 03
Locked

If you have an email highlighted in your inbox of Outlook and at the same time of holding down the "shift" key you press the "del" key you get the message "do you want to permanantly deleted this message".
If you click yes, where do these messages (emails) go to?, as they do not appear in the recycle bin.
Do they just disapear never to be seen again, or are they 'hidden' in some obscure directory waiting to be found in years to come?

Thanks

Chris B

  MAJ 00:20 18 Apr 03

They're deleted without going to the deleted items folder or to the recycle bin. They remain on your hard drive, but can't be accessed, until they are overwritten, the same as any other deleted file. They can be restored with specialised software, but that's another story.

  ChrisBnSueR 00:46 18 Apr 03

The reason I ask is that the email in question was rather wierd. It came from an address that I know, but unlike a normal forwarded message that begins Fw: there was another word (that I can't remember) with a colon(:) before the title "splish_splash".

The message body also contained text along the lines of "here are the files/attachements you requested", when I hadn't requested any???

The whole thing looked rather dodgy so I "permanatly deleted" it.

Having calmed down I wondfered if I could see the file again in order to send details to Symantec etc in case this was a potential problem

Thanks again

Chris B

  MAJ 00:55 18 Apr 03

It was probably a virus, ChrisBnSueR. You did the right thing. Email the person it came from and ask them to scan their system.

  Megatyte 00:58 18 Apr 03

Could have just been a link to click here

AH

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

What is Amazon Go and will it come to the UK? The store without checkouts or queues

1995-2015: How technology has changed the world in 20 years

Hands-on with the Star Wars fighting drones you can fly yourself

iPhone 9 and beyond: 32 amazing future smartphone developments - graphene, supercapacitor…