Router confusion

  Ray5776 13:39 29 Apr 06
Locked

I would like to network two computers using a router.
The router I have is a BT Voyager 205, not surprisingly it seems to be for use with BT Broadband.
Can I set it up for use with Wanadoo (my ISP) or is it just for BT Broadband.
All instructions etc. are based ON BT Broadband.
Any help appreciated, thanks

  mgmcc 13:58 29 Apr 06

Some BT Voyager routers have been "crippled" so that they can only be used with BT's own broadband service. I believe this is achieved by requiring a BT email address as the login. Wanadoo are guilty of the same insidious practice with their Livebox hardware.

If the router was originally supplied as part of a BT broadband package, it is likely to be restricted in this way, whereas standard retail versions wouldn't be.

  Ray5776 14:23 29 Apr 06

How do i find out if it is restricted or not, not sure where to start with this project.

  Ray5776 15:24 29 Apr 06

From a bit of Googling it seems that the Voyager 205 is not locked to any ISP so will work with Wanadoo.
Also says it does not require any drivers.
So when I have everything connected up how do I establish the connections please anyone.

Ray

  ade.h 16:13 29 Apr 06

No router requires drivers or software, because they do not install like - say - a printer, but simply connect. The client doesn't know that there is a router present, just that there is a network, workgroup/domain and internet connection being delivered through the LAN adapter.

Initial router config, plus the subsequent adjustment of any wireless-related settings must (in virtually all brands of router) be performed over an RJ45 Ethernet connection. I once crashed my router by not observing this rule! So, once the router's power brick and modem cable have been plugged into your surge protector (which is strongly recommended) you then plug the RJ45 lead (normally supplied) from the router to your PC's Ethernet LAN port.

Next, configure your client firewall to allow communications over the LAN by placing the adapter in the Trusted Zone. If you run your firewall in an advanced or learning mode, this is normally done when it prompts you.

Enter the IP of your router's config (normally 192.168.*.1 where * is 0, 1 or 2) into your browser's address bar. Then enter any pre-existing default password into the config utility login page that appears. Any further advice will, of course, be specific to your chosen router.

  mgmcc 16:58 29 Apr 06

<<< How do i find out if it is restricted or not >>>

When you set up the router's ADSL settings to connect to your ISP, you need to enter (among other things) your Username & Password. If it has been restricted, it will only accept a valid BT login. If this isn't the case, it should be OK for use with Wanaoo.

  Ray5776 17:39 29 Apr 06

Thanks for the info ade.h and mgmcc.
That clarifies a lot of things, the only networking I have done before has been using a Xover cable.
It would seem that I do not need the BT CD at all then?
The router I have requires one machine connected via USB (one that is currently the host)and the other via ethernet. Only one USB & one Eth socket on router)
When I plug the router into machine 1 via USB it recognises new hardware and asks for the driver which it can`t find anywhere including on the CD.
Also not sure how to access the router to set up the ADSL.
Am I correct in assuming that I will have to set up the Wanadoo connections on the second machine or is this done by the router?

Thanks for you help

Ray

  Ray5776 19:24 29 Apr 06

I have been looking for a site that will explain the basics of networking with a wired router but have yet to find anything useful.

  mgmcc 20:05 29 Apr 06

<<< It would seem that I do not need the BT CD at all then? >>>

You will for the USB connection but not for an ethernet connection. You will have to install the necessary drivers and software to create the connection that then appears in the Network Connections folder.

<<< Also not sure how to access the router to set up the ADSL. >>>

Normally a router's Setup pages are accessed by entering its IP address into a web browser, but you may have to run a wizard on the CD to configure this particular router. I would be inclined to run the CD in the PC that is going to connect by USB and take it from there.

<<< Am I correct in assuming that I will have to set up the Wanadoo connections on the second machine or is this done by the router? >>>

You don't set up ISP connection settings in any computer, it is the router's function to establish the connection to the ISP and the computers get their internet access over the LAN from the router.

  Ray5776 20:17 29 Apr 06

Thanks again mgmcc, things are becoming clearer at last.
If ethernet is the best way to connect why don`t they put 2 ethernet connections on the router instead of a USB, baffled at times.

  mgmcc 20:49 29 Apr 06

<<< If ethernet is the best way to connect why don`t they put 2 ethernet connections on the router instead of a USB, baffled at times. >>>

Conventional routers from the mainstream manufacturers - Belkin, Netgear, D-Link, Linksys, 3Com etc - have a built-in network switch providing 4 ethernet ports and they don't use USB at all. As far as I'm aware, it is only the BT and Wanadoo Livebox products that use a USB connection.

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