Rom, Ram processor power??

  jake2 18:53 06 Aug 05
Locked

ROM: is the memory on your hard drive. The faster your hard drive the quicker the programs will be found and opened? Right? When the hard drive becomes full this will slow things down?
RAM:The memory used to run an application, The more ram the better for memory intensive programs ie graphics etc?
PROCESSOR POWER: The more powerfull the processor the faster your computer will run the programs?
Now how much of this is true? Just wondering what noticeable difference upgading any of these items would make to the day to day running of the pc? I'm also guessing that unless the full resources are being stretched upgrading would'nt make any noticable differences. Right or wrong?

  Completealias 18:56 06 Aug 05

I have always been told that the single most effective upgrade you can do for performance is to upgrade your RAM.

  Forum Editor 19:08 06 Aug 05

A RAM upgrade is always a good thing, and you can never have enough. The more RAM you have, the less Windows will have to use what is called virtual RAM - an area on your hard drive which Windows uses as an overflow area, if it needs somewhere to temporarily store data, or parts of open applications.

Your hard drive is a storage area by the way, it isn't memory at all in the conventional sense, and it certainly isn't ROM. ROM stands for 'Read Only Memory' and is what you have in an embedded chip - you don't normally write to ROM.

This whole subject is full of quirks and misinterpretations, and of course no single computer component works in isolation - they all depend on each other in some way, and bottlenecks can occur. When setting out to build a computer you are constantly trying to ensure that no single component creates a bottleneck - there's no point in having a lightning-fast processor if it shuffles data so fast that it runs out of RAM, or if the hard drive access time is too slow to supply the pasts of a program when you launch it.

Go for RAM as your first choice of upgrade, and see what a difference (if any) you can detect.

  DieSse 19:46 06 Aug 05

"ROM: is the memory on your hard drive."

No - You do have some EEPROM (similar) in your system - it's the CMOS/BIOS.

"The faster your hard drive the quicker the programs will be found and opened?"

Yes to some extent.

"When the hard drive becomes full this will slow things down?"

The hard drive will never become full - the system won't allow it as it will not function correctly.

As it becomes fullER there may be a small performance hit - but on modern systems it won't be particularly noticeable.

"The more ram the better for memory intensive programs ie graphics etc?"

Yes - up to limits, and varying between one OS and another.

"the more powerfull the processor the faster your computer will run the programs?"

Yes - up to limits - there may be another limiting factor, such as graphics power, that prevents a program running faster no matter how fast the processor (eg - in games)

"I'm also guessing that unless the full resources are being stretched upgrading would'nt make any noticable differences. Right or wrong?"

Of course, that's correct. more or less.

Whether you go for RAM or processor, or graphics power first, depends on where your system is most deficient at what applications you want to run.

  woodchip 20:08 06 Aug 05

"ROM Read only Memory not Hard Drive it's a CDROM. "Ram Random Access memory" You can write, read, to this sort of memory

  Belatucadrus 22:45 06 Aug 05

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