Replacement CPU and Windows XP

  DianneJ 14:00 26 Jun 07
Locked

An engineer (new to me) has told me that I needed a new motherboard, and processor - which he says he has fitted. He says the new processor is identical to the old one because otherwise "Windows XP wouldn't work". I think I've heard before that Windows XP 'recognises' the processor it is installed with and a new copy of Windows XP is required if the processor is changed. Is the engineer correct that a processor of the same spec will work - or is the 'new' processor - actually the 'old' one?

  cream. 14:08 26 Jun 07

" He says the new processor is identical to the old one because otherwise "Windows XP wouldn't work". "

thats rubbish. XP should boot with a different cpu. It's the motherboard that is the problem. if you change to a different motherboard you can get problems but they are easy to sort out.

  ambra4 14:19 26 Jun 07

What a joke engineer he just want your money

Is your pc working fine and you are happy

leave well alone,

  bjh 14:22 26 Jun 07

It certainly isn't correct - even an OEM copy of Windows will work with an upgraded processor, but often a different motherboard (even the same model, but with a different BIOS) will trigger product activation.

It's impossible for us to say that this is or isn't the same processor.

Can you give us information on who the engineer is (i.e. what Company - no personal names), whether the machine is a branded (eg Dell, Evesham), why you went to an engineer anyway, and how much you were charged?

It may all be above board, but more information would help us make an informed judgement.

  DianneJ 14:29 26 Jun 07

He has also replaced the motherboard - so perhaps I misunderstood him when he said the processor was the critical component. Its a Mesh computer (out of guarantee) and it wouldn't switch on - although it sometimes did if I 'jiggled the wires'. He diagnosed that the processor had overheated a few weeks ago and that had caused the problem. Haven't got it back yet - just wondered if I'm being conned for a major repair for a simple fault - or even being re-sold my old components.

  cream. 15:04 26 Jun 07

" Its a Mesh computer (out of guarantee) and it wouldn't switch on - although it sometimes did if I 'jiggled the wires'. "

When you jiggled the wires did the computer start and run as normal. That is not shutting down or giving error messages? If it did it may have just been some loose component.

The thing is you have to TRUST this engineer. How can you prove that the new pieces have not been put in. You could ask for the old motherboard and cpu. The only way might be by opening the case and looking at the motherboard. It would be difficult to tell if it was new or old. Unless you could spot dust on it.

  bjh 17:50 26 Jun 07

Suggestion: ask for the old (dead) components back.

If he has yet to do the work, and is dishonest, he may suddenly find a "miraculous" fuse that is all that needs replacing after all. If he's done the work, and hasn't changed a thing, he'll find it very difficult to find matching "old" components.

If he is honest, you'll get a little bag of dead processor & motherboard, and a working computer. He will have absolutely no use WHATSOEVER for the junk, and will be glad it's going in your bin, not his.

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