Protecting garden furniture!

  spuds 09:14 24 May 11
Locked

Apologies for not being a computer related request, but with the various experts within the forum, someone will most likely have the answer.

Yesterday we took possession of some new softwood pub style garden furniture, which will replace our very old previous items. The manufacturer as Cuprinol 'protected' the items, and it as been suggested as an additional 'far greater - all weather and environment' safeguard to either linseed (boiled or raw) or teak oil the items.

What advice or experiences have you had on this subject?.

  sharpamat 09:28 24 May 11

the easy way is to get a set of covers when its not in use. Look at Lidels or Aldys for offers

  Terry Brown 09:37 24 May 11

Although they are marked as Cuprinol 'protected' , it is always best to add further layers yourself, Cuprinol is available from most DIY shops, and comes in clear or various colours.

I would suggest for the first year 2 coats about 3 months apart and then yearly after that.

It would also be benefical to raise the area's that touch the ground slightly by means of 'Furniture pads'-- small pads that go under the legs of furniture to protect (or lift from) the ground.

Hope you have many years of happy service with it.

Terry

  spuds 10:39 24 May 11

Thanks guys for the responses.

In previous (most) years we have always given the garden furniture an extra layer of protective paint, but while the furniture as 'lasted for ages', it still hasn't stopped the garden furniture from suffering in later years. Hidden rot was first noticed this year, when the weight of one of the dogs found it. Hence the suggestion of perhaps using linseed or teak oil. Yacht varnish or Dutch oil varnish was also mentioned!.

Cuprinol seem to offer a 'varnish' that should have been put on the timber before other treatment,so as to seal the wood, but that idea seems to have gone past the initial thought?.

Regarding covers, we already have a number of items with tarpaulins over them for protection, any more covers and the garden areas will look suspicious to regular low-flying police helicopters!.

  woodchip 11:34 24 May 11

Oil is going to come off on to your cloths. Varnish is past its sell by date, Stick to Cuprinol, You could also use one of those silicon based Products that keep water out, clear one

  Belatucadrus 11:34 24 May 11

I just purchased a wooden bench seat for my Mother, as with yours it said on the box treated with preservative. Just to be on the safe side I did it with Teak oil, it soaked up half a bottle like a sponge and looked much better for it. One thing I'm going to do is sit the legs in a tray of oil and let them soak as this would seem the most vulnerable point for water or physical damage.

  Belatucadrus 11:36 24 May 11

PS teak oil contains a solvent so it dries fairly quickly and we've had no marking up of clothing from the seat.

  spuds 13:43 24 May 11

Reading the trade catalogues, it would appear that Teak oil is a UV protector more than a rot preventer or water sealer protector?.

  Belatucadrus 15:22 24 May 11

The teak oil I've got is a blend of Linseed oil and solvent so it'll penetrate dry wood and is bound to improve waterproofing, but it doesn't seal the wood. This is the first piece of outdoor furniture we've had that suggests Teak oil as a protectant, all the others have been varnished or done with exterior wood stain/seal like cuprinol. They have all lasted very well but do on occasion benefit from being stripped down with a hot air gun and done from base wood.

  woodchip 15:30 24 May 11

Wood should not be sealed when outside, it should be able to breath. That's why such as Cuprinol is best

  woodchip 15:30 24 May 11

Wood should not be sealed when outside, it should be able to breath. That's why such as Cuprinol is best

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

Surface Pro (2017) vs Surface Pro 4

20 groundbreaking 3D animation techniques

How to mine Bitcoin on Mac