Powerline networking - any good?

  Pineman100 19:24 15 Jan 07
Locked

I currently use a wireless router for my broadband connection (just one computer with an adapter). But it has never been 100% reliable, and my wife worries about the radio frequency waves in the house.

I'm wondering whether a powerline network is the way to go. Does anyone use this system?

If so, please could you give me your views on its effectiveness, cost and safety? Do you have any problems with noise on the circuit, or is this effectively filtered out?

I don't imagine that speed is going to be a problem, as my BB connection is only 2 meg.

Any thoughts would be very welcome, please.

  Tim1964 20:02 15 Jan 07

I use it/them to connect my son's PS2 (upstairs) to the router(downstairs) and they were literally plug 'n play. I got the first pair from ebay for £30 brand new and they retail for about £25 each.

I have the 14 Mbps units which is more than enough for a PS2 but will still be plenty for my 5 Mbps BB service. As you are not connecting 2 or more PCs over them then you won't need the 85Mbps units.

  FreeCell 20:42 15 Jan 07

click here

Not a great deal on the use but they gave it 8/10 so presume it works fine.

  Pineman100 11:01 16 Jan 07

Thanks for your personal experience, which is encouraging.

As I already have a wireless router/BB modem unit (Belkin) my plan was to run an ethernet cable from the router to one powerline unit, then ditto from the second powerline unit to the computer's ethernet card.

But do you happen to know whether this would automatically disable the wireless function on the router (which is what I want to do)?

  FreeCell 17:50 16 Jan 07

Just plugging cable in will not disable the wireless function, you will have to do that via either the control panel for the router or, on some models, by button on the router.

  Pineman100 17:46 22 Apr 07

Ashamed to say that I forgot about this thread for a long time, without closing it.

But I have one other question: Is powerline networking secure? Can data "escape" from your own domestic wiring system and travel down public cabling? If so, what's its range?

  howard64 18:09 22 Apr 07

the electricity supply in this country is 3-phase in effect 3 separate supplies. Every 3rd house is connected to the same phase normally. Therefore every 3rd house will be able to get the signal if they have the same units. The distance involved is the area supplied by the mains transformer that your supply comes from. This could be 2 or 3 streets in town or a couple of miles in outlying areas.

  FreeCell 18:18 22 Apr 07

Think they all use encryption so you can set up security just as with wireless network. Worth checking on particur make/model you choose.

(Based on click here)

  Stuartli 18:20 22 Apr 07

Your wife doesn't need to worry about the wireless side of a network...:-)

  Pineman100 18:32 22 Apr 07

Stuartli - believe me, my wife doesn't need any kind of electronic device to help her to network information!

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

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