Phone line powersurge protection for broadband LAN

  malynx 20:57 10 Nov 05

I'm setting up a home Ethernet network for the purpose of sharing ASDL broadband internet.
My proposal is to connect the micofilter to a modem/router then run an Ethernet cable to each computer (two).
Both computers have power surge protection extension cables that offer telephone protection.
The problem is that the microfilter plugs directly into the wall telephone socket.

How can I protect my network from phone line power surges?

  ade.h 21:03 10 Nov 05

Does the surge protector use a rectangular socket, like the wall socket, or a small square one, like a modem cable before you put the adapter on it?

  malynx 21:28 10 Nov 05

The wall socket is a standard BT socket. A standard telephone cable as used for v92 dial-up internet connection fits into the surge protectors.
The output socket from the microfilter is an RJ11.
I have just discovered that it is possible to purchase cables with a BT connection at one end and an RJ11 at the other, however, this solution would require two such cables (at total cost of £18!).
This leaves a huge excess of cables too!

Would such an arrangement slow down the network?

Would I have to worry about this if I used a wireless router instead?

  ade.h 21:39 10 Nov 05

Regarding your last two questions; not sure, to be honest.

Regarding your response to my query; I am surprised that the surge protector has a square socket, rather than a rectangular BT socket. It kind of limits anyone wishing to use it for a standard phone cable or, as in your case, a micro-filter rather than a modem cable.

Given that adapters to turn modem cables into BT fittings (for use with dial-up modems) are freely available and tend to come bundled with the leads, I wonder if you could find an adapter that will do exactly the opposite - turn your micro-filter's BT fitting into a modem-type fitting.

Or, maybe it's possible to get micro-filters that have the small modem-type heads rather than the BT type.

  malynx 21:57 10 Nov 05


Sorry, I seem to have misled you.

The micro-filter that connects into the BT wall socket has an RJ11 output socket.
The supplied cable is an RJ11 - RJ11.
The Surge protector accepts standard BT connections only, ie the rectangular kind. (Although the packaging states these are "Phone/Fax/Modem Ports: protect phone/broadband lines" the only connection that will fit is the rectangular, standard BT kind).
The modem/router requires an RJ11 input.

I suppose the solution will have to be to use two BT - RJ11 "adapter cables". I will have to look into these prices and lengths.


  ventanas 22:10 10 Nov 05

I run my broadband, and everything else, through a surge protector. It has two of each type of connection for the "phone" connections, RJ11 and standard BT, so no problems. I suggest you look around. I bought mine at Argos.

  malynx 22:20 10 Nov 05

Sadly I've already bought the Surge Protectors when I recently bought the computers. They are both Belkin SurgeMaster - one is a 6-socket Superior series, the other is a 4-socket Standard series.
The Standard series one only has BT ports: one in and one out.
The Superior series one has three ports (!) all of which appear to be BT ones. I only have the picture to go until it arrives tomorrow with my new PC.
Both products are claimed on box and website to give Phone/Broadband protection.
I'm quite annoyed now!

  ade.h 15:12 11 Nov 05

Malynx - I'm afraid I'm at a loss to know what an "RJ11" is!

If it is small and square, like the connector that goes into an internal modem (I don't use USB modems, so they may possibly be different, I don't know) then just put an adaptor on it, as I described above.

They are the ones that come with virtually all modem cables (certainly the ones that I've always used anyway) and convert the little square bit into a BT fitting.

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

Nintendo Switch (Nintendo NX) release date, price, specs and preview trailer: Codename NX console…

1995-2015: How technology has changed the world in 20 years

8 things designers (and brands) need to know about the modern woman

How to speed up a slow Mac: 19 great tips to make an iMac, MacBook or Mac mini run faster | Speed…