PCMCIA SLOT DEADER THAN A DEAD THING -

  griff835 19:45 11 Mar 06
Locked

Hi there, this is driving me mad, Have a linksys WPC54G wifi network adaptor in my Dell Latitude laptop which was working fine until.....I popped in the Xircom ethernet card to use a dial up connection as I have been working away - Couldn't get that working and now the adaptor won't either. There are no lights on the card and XP is not detecting it after a complete removal and reload of the software

I have been fiddling with the network settings but have just reformatted the drive as a final try reinstalled all driver and theres no life at all. The rest of the machine is working perfectly and Device manager reports the cardbus controllers as working

Can anyone help, Have I fried my PCMCIA slot or is there any other way of diagnosing the fault ?

Grateful for any assistance

  Forum Editor 11:00 12 Mar 06

We would all like to think that we never force a PCMCIA card into its slot, but did you, even if ever so slightly, push harder than necessary?

The internal interface is fragile, and it's not unknown for a pin to bend - usually without the user having any indication. The cardbus would carry on reporting an OK status to the operating system. You are unlikely to have fried the slot, but the effect would be the same, and this isn't a repair you can do yourself.

I hope that isn't the problem, but in view of the fact that neither of your PCMCIA devices now work it's looking that way. See if you can get access to another laptop and try the card(s) - that will tell you for sure.

  griff835 11:37 12 Mar 06

On Looking inside the slot with an LED all pins seems straight and accept both adaptor and the Xircom ethernet card with no resistance. I just get the feeling there is a tickbox somewhere in a network setting that I have mistakenly hit.

I'm pretty sure the cards (1 x wifi) and 2 x xircoms) cannot all be defective

possible this is a XP SP2 problem but cannot seem to sort it

  Forum Editor 00:01 13 Mar 06

recognising things that are plugged into the PCMCIA slot is about the easiest thing it does, and there isn't much that can go wrong with that side of things - provided you haven't disabled the cardbus controllers by some chance.

As you say, it's extremely unlikely that all three cards are defective, and if the receptor pins are OK the chances are good that there's a software cause. Tracking that down isn't an easy matter however, because network adapters work by default, they're very simple devices.

Take a look at the hardware in device manager, just to make sure that nothing has been disabled there somehow.

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