PC ADVISOR review of Pestpatrol

  JYPX 15:30 09 Jun 04

The article on spyware in the current PC ADVISOR appears to suggest that Pestpatrol is a MUST-HAVE for all of us. From the trial it looks good but there is a problem - it identifies approx 50 suspect items all belonging to Flashget, (not the free version of Flashget). So what do I do?Flashget is a fantastic utility but I need to know once and for all - is there a problem with this downloader. Anyone have a view that would help?

  VoG II 15:34 09 Jun 04

Pest Patrol view click here

  JYPX 15:46 09 Jun 04

Thanks VoG . I think that confirms what Pestpatrol expect me to do with Flashget. But I still don't know what to do!

  byfordr 15:55 09 Jun 04

After trying the demo version IMHO both pestpatrol thecleaner seem worthwhile additions to your armoury (often picking up bit AV, spybot or adaware miss) I guess the question is do you think its worth paying for.


  VoG II 16:01 09 Jun 04

FlashGet doesn´t contain Radiate/Aureate spyware. It contains a BHO, part
of its Internet Explorer FlashGet Toolbar. This BHO can be disabled, without
affecting the FlashGet functionality, by the freware program BHODemon:

click here

A Browser Helper Object, or BHO, is just a small program that runs
automatically every time you start your Internet browser. Usually, a BHO
is installed on your system by another software program. For example,
Go!Zilla, the downloading utility, installs a BHO created by Radiate
(formerly Aureate Media); this BHO tracks which advertisements you see as
you surf the Web.

The natural question is, what do BHOs do? The technical answer is
"anything", but generally, it will have something to do with helping you
browse the Internet. Of course, some BHOs are what is called "ad-ware"
or "spyware": they do things like monitor the websites you visit and
report this data back to their creators.

Although many people are extremely concerned about them because of the
privacy issue, BHOs are not necessarily bad things, and most of them are
well-intentioned and beneficial. For example, the P3P ("Platform for
Privacy Preferences") program spearheaded by the W3C (World Wide Web
Consortium) and major vendors, including Microsoft, AT&T, and IBM, will be
delivered as a BHO. Some BHOs, however, are placed secretly on your
system, and there is certainly no technical reason why they could not be
programmed to send information about your system (or your web surfing
habits) over the Internet without your knowledge.

Also, there is no restriction on what a BHO can do your system; it can do
anything any other program can do: read or write (or delete) anything on
your system. Usually, software is installed on your system explicitly by
you; when you do so, you are, in effect, saying that you trust the vendor.
BHOs, however, have a history of being installed without the users
knowledge (fine print notwithstanding)

Given that (a) BHOs can do absolutely anything to your system, and (b)
they are often installed without your knowledge, there is a distinct
potential for abuse by vendors. The problem is, until now you had no way
of knowing which BHOs are on your machine, who put them there, and what
they do. This is what BHODemon does - it lets you easily manage your
BHOs, and tells you what each BHO on your system is doing.

What does BHODemon do?

BHODemon scans your Registry for BHOs, and presents any it finds in a
list. By highlighting a BHO in this list, and clicking the "Details"
button, you can see information about this BHO, and even disable it if you
wish. BHOs are disabled by simply renaming the DLL that houses them. By
renaming the DLL, instead of deleting it, you have the option of enabling
it later if you wish. Why would you want to do that? Because the program
that installed the BHO will not run if it can't find the DLL: Go!Zilla,
for example, won't run if you remove its BHOs.

Source: click here

  JYPX 16:14 09 Jun 04

Many thanks VoG™

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