Partition ing & Paging File / Programs

  Bat21 14:58 06 Apr 03
Locked

I need advice please on installing progams on a partition othern than C:. Im intending to repartition my C: drive (40mg)and as a starting point would like to set up the partitions as follows, if this doesn't seem sensible please tell me.

C: Win XP etc
DR f: - Paging file - there appears to be different views on whether u should keep a small paging file on C: in addition to the main one. The majority of advice i've read tho only talks about one paging file on its own partition. Any advice please.

Dr g: - All programs
Dr h: - Trial software
Dr I: - Backup

My son has returned from uni for his easter hols and would like to load on software he uses on his course. In addition the above I was also now considering setting up a further partition for his own use and to install his software on. Would this be workable??

Thanks for any help
Bat21

  Taran 15:16 06 Apr 03

Your paging file should be on a dedicated partition on an entirely different drive to your system files or left on the same drive and in the same partition as your system files in line with a default Windows install.

You get a massive performance loss by splitting the paging file over multiple partitions or drives.

The reason it needs to be on a seperate drive to your system files is that it can be accessed when required independantly of your Windows environment. It's largely a waste of time having the paging file on a seperate partition on the same drive as Windows since the drive cannot spin up and down in response to accessing one or the other. It ends up by looking for the paging file and your system files on two areas of the same physical disk.

To clarify, the same drive is trying to spin up to allow access to both the system files on one partition and your paging file on the other, hence the necessity to give the paging file a dedicated partition on an entirely seperate drive, allowing independent access.

If you only have one hard disk I'd suggest you keep it simple and go for either two or three partitions. The first should contain your Windows istall and all application software, the second could contain your sons Windows install (which can simply be a ghost image of your own, set up as a dual boot, allowing him to put any software he likes into his own mini-system without molesting yours) and the optional third partition could be set up as a data store where you could change the default path of your My Documents folder to use it.

Ask 100 people and you'll get about as many answers but the above, in general, covers the nuts and bolts of your initial outlined plan. Keep it simple or you'll come unstuck.

Regards

Taran

  DieSse 16:09 06 Apr 03

As far as I've ever been aware, there is only one paging file - you can't have two.

As to whether you keep it on the same or a different drive or partition is a difficult question. Wherever it is, the system has to go and read it when required - whether the switching time to go to a second drive, and then go to the page file is faster or slower than doing the same thing on a single drive, would be one for some very carefully constructed timing tests. Since you don't talk about a second physical drive, I would keep it simple and leave it in the main C partition.

  Bat21 22:09 06 Apr 03

Taran & DieSse

Thanks to you both for your help I appreciate you taking the time to respond.

DieSse - CAn you get hold of a copy of the Windows Xp mag., Feb2003, On p65 there is a reference to setting a pagefile on a dedicated partition of your hard disc, but although the bulk of your page file is placed on the dedicated partition it would be "inadvisable to completely remove it from the Boot partition as Windows uses it to dump memory in case of a serious error"

Can all be a bit confusing, but I agree that in raising questions you can get many different answers - confusing what! This is why I asked for help in seeking the best solution.

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