Ordinary telephone cable bandwidth capability

  keewaa 18:36 08 Apr 06
Locked

Belkin do a high speed modem cable for up to 100Mbps which is a fancy thick silver thing, and an older cable which look more like ordinary phone wiring.

I was wondering what speed ordinary BT house telephone cabling (that BT have installed in houses for telephone extensions) can handle and if it is all going to have to be upgraded soon as adsl speeds increase ?

  howard63 11:59 09 Apr 06

until such time as all local loops are changed over to fibre optics the copper wire cables will do just nicely.

  Forum Editor 13:12 09 Apr 06

of a twisted pair copper cable is 1Mhz.

There are various external factors which affect the performance of a copper wire connection; these include the length of the copper line, its wire gauge, the presence of bridged taps and cross-coupled interference.

Line attenuation increases with line length and frequency, and decreases as wire diameter increases. A bridged tap is an unterminated wire pair that sits in parallel to the main wire pair. In the local loop they appear when BT (or anyone else) "taps" off an existing pair to provision a new service to someone. Usually this work doesn't involve removing the unused cable segment and a bridged tap is created. In the home, every unused phone jack also represents a bridged tap.

All in all, the copper wire in our homes makes a pretty good job of handling ADSL services - partly because only a tiny portion of the maximum bandwidth is used by the analogue phone calls we make.

  spuds 13:32 09 Apr 06

I know this is not a direct answer to your question. But when I approached Belkin about usb1 and usb2 cabling, they stated that there wasn't much difference, and whichever cable that I used should give very similar results.This was at the time, usb2 had just come into service, and the usb2 cables were very expensive, compared to usb1 cable.

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