New site too big

  caast©? 19:56 26 Mar 04
Locked

I have more or less just finished a new site, but it looks far too big. I have the web space but other sites I have constructed, just have one or two meg. This is knocking on the door of 45 meg and I have not finished.

The problem is, it is a site with a lot of my artwork, and displays gallerys in thumbs, which show a larger picture in a pop up window. On average the pop up pictures are approx 50Kb. but there are about 600 of them.

Can I reduce these even more without losing any detail? (I have paintshop pro 8)

I eventually want to add a shopping basket, so I want potential to be able to see a decent picture of what is available.

  Kalitechnis 20:53 26 Mar 04

caast©? (??)

well, I have just replied to yr rply to my post (DW preload images).
And someone told me that my 60 odd images (most of which are rollovers were too many.But 600..sheesh!

Please post the address-I would v. much like to see yr work.

Cheers,
Peter (Kalitechnis).

  slowhand_1000 00:19 27 Mar 04

How big are the images in size - as in pixels?

Apart from optimising, have you thought of reducing the actual image size and resolution?

  caast©? 17:54 27 Mar 04

Site not uploaded for obvious reasons.

slowhand_1000
the sizes vary as do the pop-up windows. on average 300,450 pixels I would say
some are smaller

  Taran 17:59 27 Mar 04

Do you actually expect any of your visitors to wade through even a small proportion of those images ?

Have you divided your images logically by whatever system is appropriate or do you have some spectacularly clever navigation underpinning everything ?

Many web hosts will allow you a lot of web space, but that is only part of your problem. Bandwidth could well turn into your biggest enemy. Every image requested will consume some of your available bandwidth and this can quickly get out of hand on a busy site. A couple of thousand site visitors in a month rack up a lot of bandwidth if they all click just a handful of your images.

Without seeing the site or knowing your goals, direction and so on it is difficult to advise. I would strongly suggest that you prune that image collection down very, very seriously - removing about 90% or so would be a very good idea :o)

Most of the artwork sites I've done concentrate on samples from different categories with a range of available prints [for example] in galleries. Interestingly, examination of site stats on those artwork sites I've done indicate that the first one or two galleries get a lot of traffic while the last galleries get almost nothing. Unless you have some extremely clever navigation or sorting system at work, the vast majority of a 600 image site will never, ever see the light of day on a visitors monitor.

I'd hate to try and manage a 600+ image site. In fact, I'd almost certainly refuse outright to even begin on one.

You might want to rethink things a little.

There's a lot to be said for "less is more", but as I've said, without a lot more detail it's all but impossible to be anything other than very general in possible solutions.

  Pesala 18:00 27 Mar 04

An art site should have high quality images. If you commpress them too much they won't be very impressive. Reducing the size may be the best option. These images are all 640 x 480 pixels. The original was not of the highest quality. The Filenames indicate the quality settings in Irfan View.

51 Kybtes click here 75

31 Kbytes click here 50

21 Kbytes click here 30

You could reduce your pics to a quality of 50, but reducing the size to 400 pixels wide with higher quality might be better. You could also experiment with PNG. Depending on the number of unique colours, they can be more compact than JPG.

Optimising the file size is worth a huge amount of effort on such a large site, not because of the server space, but because of the bandwidth and speed of loading for users.

Take a look at this site click here for some useful advice on graphics formats.

  Pesala 18:11 27 Mar 04

click here this site seems to use fairly small pictures - about 200 x 300 pixels at most.

The Virtual Art Museum is much more generous click here

  caast©? 18:51 27 Mar 04

Pesala Its obvious I need to do a lot of work still to get the site down.

Thanks for the advice Taran, I think I will weed out quite a few pictures and just keep what I consider to be the best.

As you may gather I have spent a lot of time constructing the site which has about 24 galleries each with upto forty pics 40.

I will post the index page and maybe a gallery so you can view them, but that will have to be some time tomorrow as I have an early start and with the time shift will have to be going to bed in a hour or so. I have four days off after that so have a little time to work on it.

I have transferred site on to my laptop so can work on it Sunday while I am at work. M

  Forum Editor 19:24 27 Mar 04

doesn't need hundreds of images. Most sites of this ilk contain a representative sample of various genres, so potential purchasers can get an idea, and these link to separate directories containing more images in each genre.

As Taran has said, 600 images on one site is far too many for the average visitor to browse, quite apart from the bandwidth consumption. To get some idea of the complexities involved in presenting large numbers of images take a look at this

click here and note the file sizes and loading times.

  caast©? 20:06 27 Mar 04

however the site does show images in the pop ups that are not much larger than the thumbs.

Probably I should be changing to this rule, however I have spent a lot of time creating and was not ready to start over again, though it seems I may have to reconsider changing the concept altogether M

  Taran 21:09 27 Mar 04

You should understand one very important factor which should really have been considered at the pre-design stage of your site: pop ups as a method of delivering your content will prevent the site displaying properly [or even at all] for many people.

More and more computer users are becoming very worried about security and many PC users employ a variety of firewalls, pop up stoppers and some people even use browsers that disable pop ups by default.

In that case, your site suddenly requires its visitors to manually adjust their browser, or give your site special security permissions for their firewall, or disable their pop up stoppers - not many will opt for this since the whole point of using said software is to stop the very thing your site wants to use.

I'm not trying to undermine you or rain on your parade, but I'd urge a very thorough re-think and a serious re-evaluation of what the site is, what it is meant to do, and how best to get it to do it.

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