New PC, advised 'Hard Drive is Kaput' Do U Agree

  Paul-has-more-of-a-clue...:@) 12:03 01 Nov 06
Locked

hello all

One of the PC's (at work) 'fell over', and has not worked since. It was ytaken away by a member of staff, who returned it and reported that the hard drive was kaput. (He used more colourful language than this but you get my drift, but having been given top advise from this forum in the past I wondered if anyone could help us determin whether it is kaput, or just needs this and that button pressing....

So what is happening....

When The pc is turned on it is saying

"Floppy diskette seek failiure
Strike F1 to continue, F2 to run the setup
utility.

Press F1 however 'Missing operating system' come up.

so [ress F2 and enter system.

System info is displayed
processor info is displayed
Memory info is displayed
PCI info is displayed
Date and time is displayed and accurate
Boot sequence. This has a list of 4
1.Onboard or USB floppy drive (not present)
2. OnboardSATA hard drive
3. Onboard or USB CD-ROM drive
4. Onboard IDE Hard drive (Not Present)

there is a load more in list Drives, Onboard devices
Video
Performance
Security
Power management
Maintainence
POST behaviour, however there is no point in going through all these as the info I have given hopefully will allow a conclusion ie; Yes the hard drive is kaputski, or there may be a way to solve it.

I await your ever talented advice.

Paul

  johndrew 12:06 01 Nov 06

Given that this PC has been `transported` have you checked the power and data leads to the drive?

The PC stopped operating a few weeks ago, and despite its removal and return the same message is being displayed

  Splodge 12:30 01 Nov 06

Try re-format and re-install if you can bear to lose the info!

The PC runs through a server.

Would reformatting effect this, and how do I reformat / reintall

  Splodge 12:45 01 Nov 06

Well a member of your staff took it home so it can stand-alone.

Also, I assume you have an original installation disk with key, so I would think that just re-running that will give you the options either to re-install but keep the data or a clean install!
Depends what you are running though!

Since I am adventurous (and stupid sometimes),
I would take out another computer's hard drive from the same network; temporarily link it to the bust computer as Master and use Acronis to copy everything across.

I do it on a regular basis because I have 4 hard drives and only connectors for 2. Two are Vista beta tests!

Or better, put the bust drive onto another of your computers standing alone, as slave and copy everything across!

Stand by for screams of rage from other members. LOL

Since the PC is reletavly newish we are gonna take it back to Dell. I just thaught if it was a quick 'press F8 ', and a few more keys it would have saved the effort, but the above sounds like too much of a risk.

The PC's were preinstalled with programmes, so no discs were supplied. (Is this right, as they are brand new and from Dell, should reboot, reformatting discs not be automatically supplied. It is OK now as they are still in warrenty, however we currently have 4 PC's and plan to get another 2. What will happen once the Dell warrenty runs out. I think I was advised somewhere that you have to ASK in order to get the reboot discs, as they don't like to, but have an obligation to give you them. Or am I thinking about something else.

The PC went down in the infancy of the company, hence there is no information of any worth to transport accross to another PC.

  Splodge 13:02 01 Nov 06

Yes definitely ask for the disks: most makers supply them automatically, it was probably an oversight!

Point out to Dell that otherwise you might have to keep using their service instead of doing it yourself.

And, that you are thinking of buying more computers (do NOT give the number) and suggest it would be in their interest to give rapid help!

Speaking personally, I buy Sony, their service is brilliant and I have done things that would send other suppliers grey!

They supply a good "Recovery Disk" too which gives the option to select the items you wish to install and not always a full installation. Mine is about 4 years old now and I can run several programs at the same time without strain.

Dell...mm!

However,I suspect it is a loose connector and trying the copy across would have been confirmation of that. If it had worked the computer has a fault; if not the hard drive is damaged!

Good Luck!

[quote]Point out to Dell that otherwise you might have to keep using their service instead of doing it yourself[/quote].

Is this not the way, in that if you are able to make your own 'repairs' you do not have to ring Dell's premium line, thus they are not going to get that extra cash.

When we take the PC back what discs exactly should we be asking for

  Splodge 08:13 02 Nov 06

No, I meant that if they want to gain the extra business they should do their best on this. They might be looking at 50 extra machines for all they know!

I would have thought Dell would send an engineer out. Do not tell them it "fell over"! A nudge could have done it if it is a faulty connection! And a faulty hard drive just because it happens.

You need the installation disks. If they provided everything they may take the view that without them you will be dependent on them, not sure.

Watch for an e-mail from john-benson18@

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