Networks and Firewalls

  mammak 19:45 06 Oct 06
Locked

This is not a question for help,

I am by no means an expert in networking but I have however got 2 desktops and 2 laptops running without fault so maybe I am middle of the road when it comes to Networking,


I have read a number of posts in here and a lot of the time the firewall causes most problems

I have found that if I uninstall the firewall prior to setting up the Network it cuts out a lot of problems in the initial setup.

I was just wondering from the real Network experts on the forum if this is an unnessery way to setting up or not so bad a bit of advice ecpecially for beginners?.

I fully expect feedback to this in the way of get real or somit :-) lol

  ade.h 20:10 06 Oct 06

It should be totally unnecessary, but not only that, it may present you with the very problems that you were trying to avoid in the first place.

It's unnecessary because the user should always ensure that his/her firewalls are correctly configured and/or the firewall should be sorting out the rules. When and how that happens depends very much on how the firewall needs to be configured - whether it happens automatically, or it asks the user for a permit/block response whenever something new happens, or perhaps needs fully manual configuration.

It's a potentially bad idea because a firewall that has just been installed needs a lot of configuring - if it prompts you, you will spend the first couple of days answering a lot of pop-ups, and if it needs manual configuration, that's a lot of work for you. With automatic rules, you still need to check them as you would have done had the firewall been left in place, except that those rules are potentially more likely to be wrong or missing completely, because they have been (or not) created in response to an existing configuration rather than a new event.

It's a lot easier just to leave it installed and running, then deal with it as appropriate.

  mammak 21:20 06 Oct 06

No probs hence why I decided to ask an expert like your self before ever giving this as advice,
thanks again for your explanation on the subject.

it is much appreciated as I said I am only middle of the road with Networking but it is good to have someone like yourself on the forum that without doubt knows what they are talking about I do tend to consider you the Networking expert on the forum as you tend to answer pretty much 100% of the questions on Networking thanks again ade.h.

  ade.h 21:23 06 Oct 06

You're too kind! In the big scheme of networks, I only consider myself "middle of the road". I find there's always more to learn and it is impossible to always be right about networking.

  mammak 21:32 06 Oct 06

You are right most of the time, and yes with Networking and computing in genral there is always something to learn but it is fun whiles your learning.

  ade.h 21:37 06 Oct 06

Yeah, the research is (mostly) quite interesting!

  mammak 13:38 07 Oct 06

>

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