NETWORK CABLE UNPLUGGED

  soldier boy 17:25 25 Apr 04
Locked

Can anyone please give me a simple explanation of this problem. I have two PCs linked with crossover cat 5 cable, both using windows XP. One can find the network but only sees itself. the other report "network cable unplugged". I have changed the network card and checked in the card properties which says this device is working properly.

  spikeychris 17:39 25 Apr 04

One of the most common probs with networking Xp is network cable unplugged, theres so many reason this can be the case as its a generic error code. What are the Duplex Settings on the problem machines NIC?

  soldier boy 20:29 26 Apr 04

I don't know what the duplex settings are nor where to find them on the problem machine!!!

  spikeychris 14:18 27 Apr 04

The duplex settings control the speed of your connection, its usually set to auto but sometimes thats the problem. From control panel open Network Connections, right click and select Properties. On the General Tab is there a "Connect using" if so click. Configure.

Click advanced and look for link speed and duplex mode or just duplex it might be called media speed. Click it and see what speed it is using (on both machines) lower the speed to 10MB half duplex on both.

  John Ross 18:33 21 Aug 04

I too am having this problem.
Two computers connected with belkin cable. Previously working OK as a home network.
Recently, network non-functioning and both computers say "Local area connection A netork cable is unplugged".
I looked at the advice above and see the 2 comuters use different nomenclature for connection type / speed. Currently they are as "Auto sense" and "Auto mode". The laptop with Belkin PCMCIA card doesn't use the phrase you mention : I guessed that "10BaseT "Twisted pair" meant the same as 10 Half Mode, but this did not remove the error message.
Any help gratefully received.

  spikeychris 19:52 21 Aug 04

"I guessed that "10BaseT "Twisted pair" meant the same as 10 Half Mode" This is not the case, one is hardware and one software. Are you using WIFI or do you have an MN130

Click Start, point to Connect To, and then click Show all connections.
Right-click the MN130 adapter connection, and then click Properties.
Click the General tab, and then click Configure.
Click the Power Management tab.
Click to clear the Allow the computer to turn off this device to save power check box (if it is selected).

  spikeychris 19:55 21 Aug 04

"I guessed that "10BaseT "Twisted pair" meant the same as 10 Half Mode" This is not the case, one is hardware and one software. Are you using WIFI or do you have an MN130 adapter? if so...

click Show all connections from connect to from start....
Right-click the MN130 adapter connection, and then click Properties.


Click the General tab, and then click Configure.
Click the Power Management tab.

Click to clear the Allow the computer to turn off this device to save power check box (if it is selected).



Click to clear the Allow the computer to turn off this device to save power check box (if it is selected).

  spikeychris 19:57 21 Aug 04

Ignore the 19:52 post

  spikeychris 20:01 21 Aug 04

If the above fails thn this from Steve Winground should help. Steve is the best in the world at this.

1. The network cable really is unplugged.

2. The network cable is defective.

3. It's plugged in, but there's nothing connected to the other end.

4. It's plugged in and connected on both ends, but the device on the
other end isn't turned on.

5. The cable is the wrong type. Connecting two computers directly,
without a hub, switch, or router, requires a crossover cable. A
regular cable won't work.

6. The cable is connected to the uplink port on a hub, switch, or
router, instead of a regular port.

7. Some hubs, switches, and routers disable the port next to the
uplink port when the uplink port is in use.

8. The network card driver program isn't working right. Download and
install the latest XP-compatible driver from the manufacturer's web
site.


9. The operating system is turning off the network card to save
power. Disable the power saving option in the network card's
properties,


10. You're using a phone line network adapter and there isn't a second
computer, with a similar adapter, running and connected to the same
phone line.

11. You've disabled the radio on a wireless network adapter.


12 The network card is defective.

  spikeychris 20:07 21 Aug 04

Steve Winograd says this >>>>

1. The network cable really is unplugged.


2. The network cable is defective.


3. It's plugged in, but there's nothing connected to the other end.


4. It's plugged in and connected on both ends, but the device on the
other end isn't turned on.


5. The cable is the wrong type. Connecting two computers directly,
without a hub, switch, or router, requires a crossover cable. A
regular cable won't work.


6. The cable is connected to the uplink port on a hub, switch, or
router, instead of a regular port.


7. Some hubs, switches, and routers disable the port next to the
uplink port when the uplink port is in use.


8. The network card driver program isn't working right. Download and
install the latest XP-compatible driver from the manufacturer's web
site.


9. The network card is configured to automatically sense speed and
duplex settings but isn't doing it


10. The operating system is turning off the network card to save
power.


11. You're using a phone line network adapter and there isn't a second
computer, with a similar adapter, running and connected to the same
phone line.


12. You've disabled the radio on a wireless network adapter.


13. The network card is defective.
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