Netgear wge111 and WPA2

  Nessie 13:11 04 Dec 14
Locked

I have a netgear wge111 than I can get WPA on but not WPA2. I have looked on the Netgear site and Google and have found mention of it but cant find any updates. Any ideas and does it make much of a difference between WPA and WPA2.

Thanks

  Bris 15:16 04 Dec 14

Had a quick look at the manual here it seems that it supports WEP & WPA-PSK only.

  Bris 15:25 04 Dec 14

For some bedtime reading here explains the difference between WPA & WPA2.

  Bris 16:16 04 Dec 14

If I am reading this correctly WPA-PSK is the same as WPA2

  Batch 16:49 04 Dec 14

Bris,

I think that's confusing things.

As I understand it:

In simple terms, WPA-PSK uses pre-shared passkey (hence PSK). The alternative is to use a key server (plain WPA). So one choses WPA or WPA-PSK depending on how the key is propagated (ie. pre-shared or from a server). For the average home user it is always WPA-PSK.

Now, within either of the above, there are two encryption standards WPA and WPA2 (yes I know it's confusing). In this context, WPA2 supports stronger encryption that WPA. WPA originally supported TKIP encryption with support for the stronger AES coming along later (which morphed into WPA2). And so we now have WPA supporting TKIP and WPA supporting TKIP and AES, but sometimes you find an old WPA implementation supporting AES (i.e. pre the morph into WPA2).

So, wherever possible, one should choose WPA-PSK and WPA2.

The way this is presented on different routers varies.

In any event, looking at the manual for the OPs router (dated 2005), WPA2 is not supported. So the best possible is WPA (with PSK for the reasons outlined above).

  Bris 17:51 04 Dec 14

Batch.

Thanks for that.

Having investigated further, you are dead right about it being confusing.

  Batch 19:16 04 Dec 14

Just saw a typo in my earlier post. The whole thing again here:

As I understand it:

In simple terms, WPA-PSK uses pre-shared passkey (hence PSK). The alternative is to use a key server (plain WPA). So one choses WPA or WPA-PSK depending on how the key is propagated (ie. pre-shared or from a server). For the average home user it is always WPA-PSK.

Now, within either of the above, there are two encryption standards WPA and WPA2 (yes I know it's confusing). In this context, WPA2 supports stronger encryption than WPA. WPA originally supported TKIP encryption with support for the stronger AES coming along later (which morphed into WPA2). And so we now have WPA supporting TKIP and WPA2 supporting TKIP and AES, but sometimes you find an old WPA implementation supporting AES (i.e. pre the morph into WPA2).

So, wherever possible, one should choose WPA-PSK and WPA2.

The way this is presented on different routers varies.

In any event, looking at the manual for the OPs router (dated 2005), WPA2 is not supported. So the best possible is WPA (with PSK for the reasons outlined above).

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