moving wireless modem router position

  pookie 12:29 PM 19 Mar 13
Locked

Hi,

Windows 7 home edition sp1. I have a BT Infinity broadband package. My BT fibre optic modem and BT wireless router (Homehub3)are plugged into the master telephone socket downstairs. The engineer fitted a new master socket faceplate at the time which he said removes the need for micro filters out of all telephone sockets in the house. My question is this. I am having a new electric socket put in my bedroom where there is already a telephone socket (which has the older style faceplate). I am thinking of moving the modem and wireless router upstairs to my bedroom as the living room is a mess with various cables. Will the broadband speed by affected by moving it from the master socket to the bedroom socket? Will I have to put a micro filter in the telephone socket in the bedroom?

I use homeplugs to connect to desktop for internet and all other devices connect via wifi.

Thank you

P

  Fruit Bat /\0/\ 12:42 PM 19 Mar 13

BT fibre optic modem because its fibre optic it needs to connect to the fibre optic in the master socket

Will the broadband speed by affected by moving it from the master socket to the bedroom socket? Yes because you will then be connecting by copper wire to the telephone socket.

Router is connected by cat5 cable to modem this is the start of the "slow down"

However all your other devices are limited by the speed of your home plugs or wireless connection.

  northumbria61 12:43 PM 19 Mar 13

I have a BT Home Hub (Not Infinity) which has been connected to a bedroom socket for the past 4 years and there has never been a problem. If the BT engineer told you the new master faceplate removes the need for micro filters out of all telephone sockets in the house then there is your answer - no you don't/shouldn't have to have a separate micro filter.

  northumbria61 12:50 PM 19 Mar 13

Fruit Bat - Am I not right in thinking that the fibre optic only goes to the BT Cabinet and the final few hundred metres to the consumer - ie: It's basically fiber to the node, usually located within 1000ft of your house, which uses DSL technology from the node to your house. Would it not be possible to use the bedroom socket in that case?

  Fruit Bat /\0/\ 12:56 PM 19 Mar 13

Yes if there is no fibre to the house then it doesn't really matter what socket its used in.

However BT do state they need to connect it to the master socket. enter link description here

  northumbria61 13:03 PM 19 Mar 13

Fruit Bat - Thanks for that.

Pookie - Only one way to find out - try it and see would be my advice.

  onthelimit1 13:54 PM 19 Mar 13

The master socket has a built-in filter. This means that all extension sockets in the house are wired to the 'phone' side of that filter, so can not receive broadband - that's the whole point of the filter!

  onthelimit1 14:02 PM 19 Mar 13

Scroll down to 'installing an ADSL faceplate' here

  pookie 12:31 PM 25 Mar 13

Thank you all for the replies.

I don't have the new electrical socket in the bedroom yet but I connected the modem/router in there using extention cable and using the telephone socket already in the bedroom.

Running tests on speedtest.net, and with or without a micro filter in the bedroom telephone socket, I didn't notice a difference to the speed from when directly plugged into the master telephone socket downstairs.

I hope this helps.

  Fruit Bat /\0/\ 13:31 PM 25 Mar 13

Glad it worked for you.

  lotvic 17:35 PM 25 Mar 13

"using the telephone socket already in the bedroom"

Having looked at my setup at home and this pic I can't fathom what you have got plugged into where. Please can you say how you can you plug into an ordinary telephone socket extension?

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