Memory Upgrade & Swap File

  bertiecharlie 19:54 24 Apr 04
Locked

Few weeks ago increased the memory on an old computer at work (OS ME) from 32mb to 64mb. Prior to the increase in memory the swap/page file, just after start up, was around 45mb (in 9 fragments!) After the increase in memory the swap/page file, just after start up, was around 40mb (in a mere 7 fragments!) This morning I nipped into work and increased the memory to 160mb thinking I would shrink the swap/page file further into maybe 3 or 4 fragments and give me back some disk space, (only 130mb free). The computer recognises the new memory but the swap/page file, just after start up, was still around 40mb in 7 fragments. Opened and closed a few programmes and the swap/page file increased and there was no improvement in performance. As if the new memory wasn't there.

I've read a few bits about manually altering the size of the page file, the elder geek etc, but if it's just going to expand again there seems little point.

I can be exact about the above figures as Diskeeper is on the machine.

Am slightly baffled as to why the swap/ page file remains the same size with the addition of so much more memory unless Windows ME is known for not managing memory very well.

(I can't mess about too much with this computer, for example getting a new hard disk, as it is networked up).

  BlueMeanie 19:57 26 Apr 04

Sorry I can't help directly, but are there any files/programs that can be deleted ?

Delete cookies/temp internet file

Delete files in Temp folders ie C:\Windows\Temp

Delete the following temp files (use care)

*.BAK *.CHK

*.Bk! *.CNT

*.$$$ *.DMP

*.000 *.FTS

*.~MP *.GID

*.OLD *.LOG

*.WBK *$.DOC

This might release those extra MB that you need.

  Valvegrid 20:09 26 Apr 04

I think you'll find the swap file is changing size all the time, mines anything from 50MB to 94MB in size, the maximum size is determined in Settings, System, click on the Performance tab then click on the Virtual memory button, you'll see how much memory Windows thinks it needs.

  bertiecharlie 21:05 26 Apr 04

Thanks for the above. I've uninstalled, deleted every thing in sight to free up hard disk space. The computer was used as a glorified word processor (OS Win.95) up until christmas when it was networked up. Now the OS is ME. The hard drive is only 1.2GB.

I understand the point about the swap file changing size, I was just a bit disappointed that the initial size of the swap file didn't reduce after putting the extra memory in. Any reduction in the overall size of the swap file is giving me back hard disk space.

I've been monitoring it today with System Monitor. The inital size of the swap file has reduced to 36MB so at least that's 4MB back, (chuckle).

I opened up everything I've got to put it through its paces, everything being, Word, Outlook Express, IE, ran Registry Mechanic, scanned with Adaware, then AVG. The scan with AVG was the killer. Free physical memory gradually went to zero (all 160MB had gone by that point) and the swap file increased in size to 60MB. (In this respect, in future, I think it probably best to restart the computer after doing a scan).

Maybe I'll get another 4MB back tomorrow. What I would really like to do is a boot time defragmentation to get the swap file in one chunk but I haven't got the knowledge or the nerve. If I can't get the computer to start, the chap who networked it up isn't going to be happy.

(Just read a thread which advised someone to apply their own virtual memory settings in ME. He advised to make the minimum and maximum the same so that the swap file will not expand or contract. I can understand setting a high minimum level but, for the life of me can't understand setting a maximum level). Anyway, enough from me.

  Valvegrid 21:14 26 Apr 04

I must admit, I've put my swap file into a separate partition with about 27GB of free space. The main reason is when I defrag it hasn't got to defrag that file, also the total amount on the C drive remains pretty constant, which gives me an indication if anything malicious is going on on C: but that;s just me being paranoid I suppose :-)

Paul.

  bertiecharlie 21:23 26 Apr 04

Valvegrid. I've read that putting the swap file on a separate partition or drive is the correct thing to do. In my case, the swap file starts off in 7 fragments and, today, when it reached 60MB it was in 11 fragments.

I must admit though that it did run better today overall, not much thrashing about on the disk, so putting the extra memory in has been beneficial. Might get it up to 256MB which is the maximum it can take. Maybe will have a word with the networking chap and see if I can add a second drive.

Thanks for your help and BlueMeanie as well.

  Valvegrid 21:31 26 Apr 04

Good luck.

Paul.

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