marvell libertas 802.11 b/g signal problems

  Keithrow 02:19 24 Apr 06
Locked

We have a PC with a marvell libertas 802.11.b/g wirelessSoft AP connected to a cable modem, Belkin 125802.11 g,

I have tried to set up a home network with our Dell notebook but am hitting my head against a brick wall.

The wireless router is sat on my computer desk with the PC sat about 30 cm directly below it. Using an ethernet cable I can connect to the internet, explorer.

If I try to connect via my wireless connection, I invariably get 'no connection' or if I'm exceptionally lucky, a very low strength connection.

Ironically, to me anyway, the notebook sitting on the table, just over a metre from the router and PC always connects wirelessly and shows excellent connection strength.

How can I improve the strength and with it te connection to my PC?

Windows XP on both computers

marvell libertas 802.11 b/g soft AP wireless card in the PC and an Intel Pro/wireless 3945ABG in the Dell notebook

Hoping someone will be able to help

Keith

  mgmcc 08:41 24 Apr 06

The router is on the desk and the PC is below the desk - what is in between? For example is the top of the desk made of steel or a similar material that could completely block the radio signal?

  Keithrow 11:33 24 Apr 06

The desk is made of wood, one of MFI's finest, and I've tried moving the router to different places and elevations. All changes of position revolve around a locus roughly 2m from the router and there is no change in the reception.

I have an ethernet connection which enables me to get online but the reception (wireless) doesn't seem to change whether or not this cable is connected.

I've checked I P adresses and Subnet Mask settings but they all seem fine.

Any thoughts?

  mgmcc 13:57 24 Apr 06

Having looked at the "Marvell" website, it appears that the "Marvell Libertas Soft AP" is actually multifunction in that it can operate as a Wireless Network Adapter, Wireless Access point or wireless network "Repeater". Do you have it configured to work in "Station" mode, which seems to be the one which is appropriate for running as a network adapter and connecting to a router?

If it is being used with a Belkin router, is it getting an IP address by DHCP in the 192.168.2.xxx range?

  Keithrow 14:58 24 Apr 06

that I know more about computers than I actually do, I've always excelled in B.S.

Belkin router part first, I have manually set the I.P. address and other connection details as the PC was not able to find the correct values.

Station mode. Not sure what you mean or how to check which configuration I have set up. These are the readings given in the wireless network connection properties box:-

Client for Microsoft Networks
Service Advertising Protocol
File & Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks
Q.S Packet Scheduler *** not the right symbol, correct one looks more like the symbol for 'degrees' but on the floor ***
NWLink Net BIOS
NWLink IPXNetBIOS Compatible Transport Protocol
Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)

I don't know whether that helps, it all means nothing to me as Ultravox would say.

Keith

  mgmcc 08:53 25 Apr 06

<<< Belkin router part first, I have manually set the I.P. address and other connection details as the PC was not able to find the correct values. >>>

The problem with setting a fixed address manually is that the PC and router may not actually be communicating. A fixed IP can hide the fact that there is still something wrong.

<<< Station mode. Not sure what you mean or how to check which configuration I have set up. >>>

To be honest, I've no more idea than you. I had a look on their website for information on a product that I had never heard of and found that the card can be used for different purposes. I would try opening the Network Connections folder, right clicking the wireless adapter and selecting Properties. Click the "Configure" button alongside the adapter details and, in the next box, select the Advanced tab. There may be an option in there to select the "mode" to use with the card.

<<< Service Advertising Protocol >>>

That's an unusual one and probably related to its use as a Wireless Access Point or repeater. I would try unticking that item.

<<< Q.S Packet Scheduler *** not the right symbol, correct one looks more like the symbol for 'degrees' but on the floor *** >>>

The "symbol" is just the letter "o" - QoS for Quality of Service :-)

  Keithrow 15:11 25 Apr 06

I feel suitably humiliated and embarrassed.

Thanks mgmcc for your time and effort.

I tried the things you suggested re 'un-ticking', unfortunately no change in signal was forthcoming.

The only thing I can think of is that I attach an amplifier or aerial to either make the signal stronger or to catch what signal is being sent. Of the two, the aerial seems more likely to bear fruit.

The WIFI card was included with the PC and if there was a need to have an aerial to achieve wireless communications, you would have thought there would be one supplied. Add naive to the list.

I'll let you know what happens when I attach an aerial although it may be a while before that happens.

Thanks again

Keith

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