Lost access to My Documents

  interzone55 15:29 26 Jan 04
Locked

It's a long story, but I'll cut out the boring bits and any swearing...
I have my My Documents folder on my D: Drive, and as I'm on a network I've made it private. Yesterday I installed Fedora Core 1 Linux on a separate drive. Whilst this is a fantastic OS, it failed to pick up my windows installation, so, in short it screwed my MBR.

I tried to repair my Windows XP Pro installation, but it didn't repair the MBR, so I reinstalled it on top of itself (never the best solution I know). This worked, but now I have 2 of me in the Documents & Settings folder and I'm locked out of My Documents.
I have a back up of the docments, but there's about 2gigs in the My Pictures folder that I don't really want hogging space.

So my question...
How do I get access to the folder?

  Taff36 16:01 26 Jan 04

Can`t an administrator log in and grant you privileges to access the files or has this little episode locked them out too? You obviously need to be able to copy your documents to your new profile and probably all your messages and address books to Outlook. (Just had to do exactly the same last week when our domain server went down.)

  interzone55 16:06 26 Jan 04

I'm at wotk at the moment, I'll try the administrator route, but my profile is already classed as Computer Administrator, is this different to the Administrator login?

  Taff36 07:53 27 Jan 04

I don`t think so. Here`s another thing to check: go to control panel then user accounts and check there that you have the right security permissions. You should see all the Users and a list of their groups - make sure you log in as one of the administrators listed and have full access to your computer. Then see if you can right click on the relevant my documents folder and bring up properties to check that the folder is shared.

Another thought - when you log on do you log on to the network domain or the local machine. (Bottom box of the log on screen) Try logging on to the local machine as an administrator.

  temp003 10:09 27 Jan 04

On the repair reinstall, it's likely that a new computer name has been created.

Log on as Administrator or your account with Administrator privileges. Right click the folder(s) or even drives of which you have lost access, select Properties, Security tab, click Advanced, Owner tab.

The current owner is shown, which should be [oldcomputername\YourUserName].

In the box for "Change Owner to", highlight your new account, such as [newcomputername\Administrator] or [newcomputername\YourUsername]

Tick the box for "Replace owner on subcontainers and objects". Click OK. You should then be able to access those folders, or if necessary, change permissions for your new account under the Security tab.

Next time you do a reinstall, try to retain the same computer name as before. You can see the current computer name by right clicking My Computer, Properties, network Identification tab.

  interzone55 10:44 27 Jan 04

Thanks for that, I'll give it a go tonight, although I'm pretty sure I kept the same computer name.

  temp003 11:21 27 Jan 04

The suggested method should work, whether there is a new computer name or not. Good luck.

  interzone55 21:48 27 Jan 04

I don't have a Security tab under properties, just a sharing tab?

Any idea what to do at this point?

  temp003 03:20 28 Jan 04

XP Pro should have the security tab (XP Home needs to go into Safe Mode).

If it's XP Pro, and logged on as Administrator, but still no security tab, try disabling simple file sharing first. In My Computer, click Tools, Folder Options, View tab, Advanced Settings, untick "Use simple file sharing". Click OK. Then try again to see if the security tab appears.

  interzone55 08:28 28 Jan 04

I'll give that a go tonight. I think I'll try safe mode as well.

Thanks

ps What are you doing answering questions on the forums at 3:20am?

  temp003 13:59 28 Jan 04

My time zone is GMT+8.

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