linux windows dual boot

  sean-278262 16:36 29 Aug 04
Locked

At last i have broadband and have just finished downloading linux (mandrake 10.0).now for the hard bit.how do i install the os so that i can dual boot.i have 2 hard drives one containing windows xp home the other is a blank formatted ntfs drive which i want to load linux onto.do i need anything more than just the 3 iso s that i got from this site click here ?i know i need to put them onto a cd, but how do i make the whole process start?

any help or advice would be a great help

  Valvegrid 17:16 29 Aug 04

You need to burn the ISO images to disk first, If you use Nero you can use that.

Once you've done that, if you explore the first disk you should find instructions on how to install Linux. Normally you just put the first disk in the CD drive switch the computer off then back on this usually starts the installation.

I would check the instructions first because it will give important instructions on disk allocation, this is important because you'll end up wiping your existing operating system off.

I use a dual boot system, 98SE and Xandros Linux, the installation was very easy with the supplied instructions.

Good luck, I'm sure you'll enjoy Linux, beware though, Windows its not! So expect a lot of learning.

  sean-278262 17:39 29 Aug 04

thanks very much m8.I hope i will enjoy linux as i hate windows i find it so often breaks while im doing something so that is why i want to try linux.

Any way thanks again so much

  LastChip 18:01 29 Aug 04

The most important part of the installation is;

1. Identifying your drives

2. Placing the boot files.

Linux does not refer to drives as A; C; D; etc, but if it's a hard drive; hda0; hda1 etc.

Assuming you want to install on "D", it will be hda1 (I suspect) but you should be able to identify it easily, as it is empty and Linux will show you the amount of used space when this part of the operation commences.

You will be asked where to load Linux. The minimum you require is a root (/) partition and a swap file, although if you wish, you can have more partitions dedicated to other operations. For example, you could place your "home" directory on it's own partition. I find this useful, as by default, all your personal files live here, and if you have to do a reinstall, you can take this partition out of the equation and leave all your personal files in tact.

Note; Linux commands ARE Case Sensitive, therefore CD IS NOT the same as cd!

Later on in the procedure, Linux will ask you how you want it to boot. You basically have three choices.

a. You can boot from a floppy disc.

b. You can use a third party boot manager such as Partition Magic.

c. Linux can load it's own boot manager (often Lilo or Grub) to your Master Boot Record (MBR).


a. Is preferred by some, but I dislike it as floppies are notoriously unreliable. The upside is, if you want to remove Linux in the future, you can simply reformat the drive and XP will work exactly as it does now.

b. Is my preferred solution, as it leaves your MBR in tact and is less likely to cause grief with XP if for whatever reason your installation doesn't go according to plan.

If you go for "b" make sure you go into the Advanced parameters during setting up you boot loader and tell Linux to write the files to the first sector of your Linux drive, NOT the MBR.

c. Is what Linux will do if you select the default parameters. Most of the time this will cause no problems, but can be troublesome if you wish to remove Linux at a later date.

The thing you will notice about Linux is the complete ability it gives you to load the system as you want it. Clearly at this stage, that may be a little intimidating for you, but as you get further into the power of Linux, you will discover a truly amazing system. Viruses are almost non-existent and security is inherently better than Windows.

I hope you find this useful and enjoy the experience.

Interesting points LastChip - filed for future ref.

  sean-278262 19:50 29 Aug 04

thanks lastchip 4 the advice i wil call bac l8r to update u about how the install went and my impressions of the os as a whole.

  Gaz_dc 23:28 19 Oct 04

Good info - bookmarking...

  rawsongreen 13:59 20 Oct 04

Into my postings.

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

What is Amazon Go and will it come to the UK? The store without checkouts or queues

1995-2015: How technology has changed the world in 20 years

Why ecommerce hasn't taken off on social media

New MacBook Pro 2016 review | MacBook Pro with Touch Bar review: Apple's expensive and powerful…