Kindle connection conundrum

  SparkyJack 17:14 PM 05 Jun 11
Locked
Answered

One of my friends has a new new Kindle, and was demonstrating all its virtues. One thing struck me- titles can be downloaded directly onto it. I assume then this must be achieved via a Cellphone account , so I asked and which does network does it go through and does it cost? I got a blank, and she said no, it just does it.

So in the words of Robert Llewellyn How Do They Do It?

  iscanut2 17:51 PM 05 Jun 11

It is just like a pc using wireless. It connects with your router or any other available one that you can use ( secured with use of password info etc ) or an unsecured one. It is a wifi device.

  lotvic 18:37 PM 05 Jun 11
Answer

There's two sorts of Kindle, here's the description from Amazon

Kindle (Wi-Fi) is a great choice if you already have a high-speed internet connection and wireless router setup at home, and do not want the added convenience of a 3G connection which enables you to download books anytime, anywhere on the go. If you do not have Wi-Fi setup in your home, Kindle 3G would be a better option.

Kindle 3G (Free 3G + Wi-Fi) is the easiest option because there is no wireless setup—you are ready to shop, purchase, and read right out of the box. Built-in Free 3G connectivity uses the same wireless signals that cell phones use, but there are no monthly fees or commitments—Amazon pays for Kindle’s 3G wireless connectivity. The added convenience of 3G enables you to download books anytime, anywhere on the go—without having to find a Wi-Fi hotspot connection. With wireless coverage in over 100 countries and territories, Kindle 3G is a great option for travelers.

  woodchip 19:21 PM 05 Jun 11

3G will be built into the device

  SparkyJack 10:33 AM 06 Jun 11

Thank you lotvic I assume therefore that as connection via any type of service is not Free as such - you pay some how - the connection fee via Kindle must be built into the price of the publication the user downloads

Advertisement

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

Sony Xperia Z5 review: Hands-on with the phone which the Z3+ should have been

1995-2015: How technology has changed the world in 20 years

How to choose a photographer

iPhone 6S preview: What to expect from Apple's next iPhone