Is it worth trying a Linux OS?

  1936 13:12 02 Jun 08
Locked

I resent the MS monopoly so is Linux a viable alternative?

  ol blueeyes 13:27 02 Jun 08

I tried it infact I've tried 4/5 different Linux and perhaps I'm thick but didn't seem to be of any real use. If you've been using XP you've got to find a lot of new Software most of which just ainn't there. As I have said before the easiest thing was making an Internet connection

  Zeppelyn 13:54 02 Jun 08

If you resent the MS monoply that much then then you have answered your own question. Try it, Ive tried Suse, Xandros and Ubuntu but to be honest, I did not enjoy the experience.

  LastChip 20:00 02 Jun 08

Yes, of course it's worth trying.

I use it almost exclusively now and in fact, this post is being written in Debian Linux.

You really need to ask yourself a couple of questions.

What do I use my computer for?

Am I prepared to invest a little time to learn something different?

If the answer to the first question is gaming, then Linux is not the answer. It's not that Linux can't play games, it's simply that all the leading games are made for Windows and there's not much you can do about that.

That aside, if the answer to the second question is yes, then try a few Live CD's of different distro's and see which you prefer. These CD's can run the operating system exclusively from the CD and therefore, do not interfere with your computer. Just keep in mind, Linux runs a lot slower from a CD, than it would properly installed.

Good starting distro's are: PCLinuxOS, Kubuntu, Linux Mint, all of which resemble Windows closely and therefore make the transition easier.

click here for something I wrote that may help you a little. There's other content on the site that you may find useful too.

As with learning anything new, the more you read, the more you learn.

  octal 20:18 02 Jun 08

I started using Linux a few years ago because I didn't like the way Windows was developing, so I installed Linux. Now-a-days Windows is confined to the back of the computer hard drive, to be taken out occasionally and the dust to be blown off to play games on, then discarded when I've finished and then go back to Linux again. I can't see any good reason to go back to Windows for my day to day use. I suppose Windows is OK, I just get less trouble with Linux than I do with Windows, it doesn't seemed to go wrong, pretty boring really.

  LastChip 20:26 02 Jun 08

Just out of interest, did you try "scribus."

click here

  HMIG 20:31 02 Jun 08

Hi

I have tried Linux (SUSE10) and found it a little frustrating so far. Having a reasonable understanding of windows and moved through that from 3.1 I was comfortable with it, Linux is not similar at all. That may seem like an obvious statement but for example setting up the mouse in Linux was a challenge, don't follow your Windows instincts.

I found the best way was to buy a well recommended book with a disc and start at page 1.

Getting your internet connection going, if you don't have another machine, can also be a challenge. Once you get started though the community are very helpful and understanding of new recruits.

If you just want windows with open source software look at OpenOffice and others.

I am fortunate enough to run both OS and still favour Windows if only because its quicker at the moment, but I am still persevering with Linux. Have a go you have nothing to loose especially as Linux runs well on older machines.

  LastChip 20:44 02 Jun 08

You'll notice I didn't mention SuSE 10, not because there's anything wrong with it, but as Novell owns SuSE now, it is more geared (IMHO) to business use.

Frankly, I find it surprising you had trouble setting up a mouse, as all the distro's I've tried have never offered any problems.

As far as the Internet goes. Without question, if you have a router (and that is far more common than it used to be), every common Linux distro will self configure. If there's one area Linux has always been strong in, it's networking.

  Picklefactory 20:49 02 Jun 08

I'm just dabbling with Linux (Ubuntu) and whilst it's new to me and I know nothing yet, I'm finding it very interesting and already have noticed some nice touches not apparent in Vista. I'm not really in a position yet to strongly recommend using it, but also I'm not finding it quite as scary as I first thought.
It doesn't hurt to try it, if you don't like....don't stay with it, however, you won't know if you don't try.

  skidzy 20:59 02 Jun 08

If interested,take a read click here
maybe of some help.

  Ronnie268 21:01 02 Jun 08

I have two linux maachines at home and I find that they can do most of the things that my XP and Vista machines can.

Try Ubuntu for usability,
Mint for features and
Mandriva for style

See my website for extra details.

http;//79.76.12.209/

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