Is it possible to block images in Outlook Express?

  Llwydyn 12:12 24 Apr 04
Locked

Am receiving more and more obscene images lately (in my primary email address which, unfortunately, I cannot change). Am using the facilities which BT Yahoo Broadband provide, have also set up rules in Outlook Express, but one or two obscene images are still received.
Is it at all possible to configure Outlook Express to not show images?

  User-312386 12:14 24 Apr 04

at this moment there is not

however, when XPSP2(which i am a BETA tester for) comes out it will have script blocking in OE

  QuickHare 12:17 24 Apr 04

One way is to go to Tools, Options.

Under the Read tab, tick the "Read all messages in plain text". This will show these messages as plain text, not HTML, which is the method used to show pictures.

Of course, other emails will be treated the same, and some imagination is needed. If it says < B > (without the spaces), then the text following is in bold. < I > means the following is in italic, and < U > means underlined.

The presence of a / means that the appropriate formatting is turned off, so < /B > means no more bold.

Small price to pay for no more images.

  Llwydyn 12:55 24 Apr 04

Thanks. Greatest concern is my kids seeing these images (they are not allowed to access Outlook Express at the moment). Do not want to hinder their use of emailing so have also decided to configure our other (old) computer to only access their mail boxes - which they will be allowed to use. No obscene images have been received in our secondary mail boxes - so far! (could easily change secondary addresses if it should happen).
Have been receiving same ½ dozen or so obscene adverts for past 6 months. I take it that thousands if not millions?) are being sent from temporary email addresses? Seeing that the same advert has been in circulation for a long time, is it not at all possible to track them down - or am I being very naïve?

  QuickHare 14:34 24 Apr 04

Most of the time, the email is sent to many people at the same time. Email servers cottoned on to this and stopped too many addresses in the To box of the email.

However, it is easy to forge a from address in a message. It cannot be just traced back to a user, but it can be traced by route across the Internet. This will only show the servers it passed through, and not necessarily the place it actually originated from.

When you connect to the Internet, you are given a four number code called an IP address. This works like a telephone number across the Net. Each time you disconnect and reconnect, you most likely will be given a diferent IP address. This is not the case for Broadband users, who are given a permanent one.

A spammer (someone sending these emails) is most likely going to use a temporary IP address to connect each time, or fake it.

It is the same email content, most likely sent by the same computer each time, but different codes names and addresses used. You can see this by looking at the code you will find on it, either on the From address, the subject line or in the message itself. It's so the spammer knows which one it is, like a serial number.

Naïvity is not a problem. PC Advisor forums are the best place to find the answers to those little questions, however simple or stupid you think they are.

It's what we're here for!

  Llwydyn 17:53 24 Apr 04

Thanks for your remarks QuickHare.
We unfortunately chose a too short a primary email address when we first went online many years ago. Nowing what I know now I would not reveal that address to anyone and only use secondary addresses - which we could easily change if need be (although it would be a hassle informing everyone of the change).
I also recall clicking on "click here if you do not want to receive further similar emails" when we once received an email from an untrustworthy source - silly thing to do (but one does learn through experience), although I did succeed to block further emails from them by using the rules in OE!

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