Internet Dialler Scams

  Nick Dalton 10:05 06 Jul 04
Locked

I had a problem on my PC which meant I had to re-install windows (ME) & as a result lost all my patches to MCAfee Delux virusscan ver 4. Tried to update patches online but the 260 plus were just too much & it kept falling over. Ordered version 8 which arrived Sat 3rd july but somehow on the Friday before we were scammed on the above by the QUIZIR dialer 0909 line.

2 questions....Should the McAfee Virusscan Ver 8 protect me going forward from such downloads & if I select the option "only connect to default connection" in control panel , internet options would this also protect me or would the dialler "virus" simply overwrite this instruction?

Appreciate any advice offered & any other steps I could take to protect my phone bill!

  ventanas 12:50 06 Jul 04

Yes it would overwrite it.

Download this click here The site is in German, but will install in English. Very simple program, it will inform you if your pc tries to dial any number other than those permitted.

Also don't rely on AV to stop dialers. This is pretty good at stopping them though. click here

  stlucia 14:01 06 Jul 04

If I've got broadband, but still have a dial-up modem connected, will I hear if a rogue dialler activates it, or is it able to mute all the noises that usually come from the modem?

  justme 14:34 06 Jul 04

Most, if not all dialers, will not only mute the sound but connect in the background so that you do not know about it.

Think about it, if you knew they were dialling premium rate numbers you would stop them, wouldn't you?

  bretsky 15:29 06 Jul 04

Antivirus programs, firewalls will not stop diallers as they come piggybacked with music download programs and various software downloads and then reside on your hard drive just waiting for you to go on the net so it can hijack your browser and dail out to various offensive sites and not only that, some are coupled with spyware so you get a load of spam coming down the line.

Get this click here its not free, but it will rid your machine of all nasties out there.

It will do a fast scan from boot up and you get free upgrades of newer versions and the program is updated on a regular basis, certainly worked for me.

bretsky ;0)

  stlucia 16:08 06 Jul 04

Thanks, justme, you've got me worried now. I've retained my dial-up modem because I need it to access my web page (free of charge on dial-up; have to pay a monthly fee if I want to do it via BB). I though that what the diallers did was to divert a bona fide connection that you made to your ISP for instance, via their premium rate number. I think I'll unplug my dial-up until I need to use it.

  georgemac 16:37 06 Jul 04

Just call BT and ask them to block access to all premium rate numbers from your phone line - no dialler can beat that. Call 0800 800 150

Just means you will not be able to enter competitions or vote on pop idol etc, unless you do it by text from your mobile.

  Nick Dalton 16:43 06 Jul 04

I've done that now.....so you think I needn't go too mental installing firewalls etc to protect me?

  justme 16:46 06 Jul 04

BT charge for their service and there is also a code which can be used to bypass the blocking. This is why BT will not refund you for any calls to premium lines made by your computer. Assume that a dialer knows the code and you can see why it is still possible to run up a large bill.

Try the program which ventanas has recommended. It works a treat and only allows your computer to dial those numbers which you allow. Any other numbers will cause the computer to stop the number being dialed until you either allow it or stop it.

It also makes a record of all calls, attempted or actually dialed. So you can see whether or not a call has been made from your computer and to what number.

  georgemac 17:58 06 Jul 04

I have had the dialler software above installed before but if you take other precautions I do not think you need it. I take the following precautions.

I do believe in up to anti virus, I run AVG which is free for personal use, and a firewall, and I use sysgate personal edition, again free for personal use.

I also have spywareblaster installed, run spybot and adaware regularly, and update them regularly, and scan regularly and fix any problems.

I also installed Prevx which I saw in a link in this forum, which is a real time malware blocker, which is in beta testing and again is free for personal use. To date I have been very impressed with it, it has detected changes I have made to registry and configuration settings which I have made.

To date I have been fortunate - no dialler intrusions, but a friend has just been stung for £200. He got BT to cancel the premium rate services, and I did not know there was a code to bypass the block, and neither does he, as BT assured him it would be impossible to get hit with any more premium rate numbers.

  georgemac 18:50 06 Jul 04

just got an email from BT about this



There are two types of potential internet scams that dial-up internet users in the UK ought to be aware of which can result in large telephone bills. These scams change the way your computer connects to the internet.

"Scam 1
The first "scam" happens when you access websites that are providing premium content. These sites can be pornographic or copyright sites, such as music and films. When the website is accessed, a large number of pop­up windows will appear and you will be asked to install some software, to facilitate the downloading of that content. This process will install a dialler that will replace your default internet connection with one that dials a premium rate telephone number.

Scam 2
The second ”scam” works in exactly the same way as the first one, however the number that is dialled is an international number, which can cost up to 60p per minute.

Broadband users
If you are a Broadband user you will not be affected, as long as you have disabled or removed the internal dial­up modem from your PC."

with a link to their advice page click here so the problem I would guess is becoming more widespread and serious

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