HTML Editors

  Pesala 22:21 01 Jun 03
Locked

Someone recommended Sc1 from Scintilla. click here I downloaded and tried this, but cannot see the output. It is very small and basic, which is all I want to start with, but I need some help on using it.

I also have Arachnophilia, but suspect that is more than I need.

Another question: how do you changed the default editor in Internet Explorer? I get a dropdown box with notepad as the only choice, and cannot change it to Sc1 or another program. Why not?

  Patr100 22:27 01 Jun 03

This link refers to setting Dreamweaver as the default HTML editor in IE , but the principle is the same for other programs. click here

  Taran 13:22 02 Jun 03

Personally I find Arachnophilia far easier to use. Sc1 takes some getting used to, to say the least, and has a few bizarre idiosyncrasies that you need to get your head around to do any serious work with it.

When you say you cannot see the output, I'm assuming you can't view the web pages you've created with the program. This is because by default it does not give a saved file a web page extension.

Make a root folder on your desktop and name it something significant, let's say you call it Test Site. When you code your web pages, save them in that folder and call them whatever name is appropriate and manually type the .htm or .html extension after you type in the name. So you select Save or Save As and name the file index.htm (as an example), saving it in your root folder and typing the file extension as part of its name.

You may find things easier if you select hypertext from the drop down list called Language on the Sc1 toolbar before you start coding.

Unless you manually give the file its extension, your browser won't know that it's a web page you are trying to open since Sc1 saves in an unformatted file that nothing recognises unless you do a little jiggery pokery with it.

I'd go with Arachnophilia or any one of a number of alternatives. I've used Arachnophilia for a long time now and it is a truly superb program for a lot more than just web pages. If you find the latest version a bit intimidating or overgunned, try version 4. You can still download it from one or two places on the web if you hunt around a bit. Version 4 wasn't Java based and it didn't require you to manually set up your internet browser for page previews and so on.

Sc1 is interesting and effective in the right hands, but it is not as straight forward as it could be.

Regards

Taran

  Taran 13:33 02 Jun 03

Without knowing what it is you personally want or need from an html editor it's difficult to suggest one product over another, but for the record the very best free html editor I know of is AceHTML 5 Free, available from click here

Quite simply, it's so good in terms of comprehensive features and layout, it's worth paying for, even though you don't need to.

  Pesala 16:32 02 Jun 03

Thank you Taran for that. Sc1 is indeed a bit of a mystery to me. I was attracted by its small size, thinking it would be simple, but there are a lot of menu options and no help file. It has no real advantage over notepad.

I have just installed Arachnophilia 5.1 and will give that a try. If I find it useful to work with HTML coding I will download AceHTML and may try it later.

At the moment I am using Net Objects Fusion 2.02, an old version that I obtained on a magazine CD ages ago. It is fine for me as it functions like a DTP program. As you may have noticed, my website is basically OK, and it took only a matter of a few hours to change the font from Arial to Verdana for 105 pages because it uses paragraph styles like a DTP program.

However, because the site is so big, if I just want to change a few details on one page such as the dates for a retreat, I found I could do this in notepad, and in the process started to understand HTML a bit. Then someone complained about having to scroll horizontally to read pages so I used notepad to delete the table widths for some pages. Of course, NOF will put them back in again when I regenerate the whole site again.

I am reluctant to part with real money as I depend on charitable donations, but I can manage £70 or so for NetObjects Fusion MX or £150 for NOF 7 if that seems like the best investment for the future. I don't understand the difference between these programs, but I like the DTP way of working, and I don't need the huge task of importing my site into a different program, or rebuilding it from scratch.

  Taran 01:49 03 Jun 03

Certain hosting options with 1&1 allow you to purchase a current release of NetObjects Fusion for just a few pounds. It's not something I've done myself but I've read the adverts and it could be a less expensive way for you to get some very nice software plus a second URL.

For the record, NetObjects Fusion is right up there with the best of them at the moment.

I wouldn't go spending a small fortune unless you are serious about getting your sleeves rolled up. I appreciate that your site is large and covers a very great deal of ground, but only you know how much time you spend on it and therefore only you can begin to place a value on the tools you might need to be more efficient and productive.

Just a thought.

T

  Taran 01:53 03 Jun 03

Sc1 and similar editors main advantage in my opinion is that it colours your code tags, allowing you to easily differentiate between code and content.

This alone puts it and similar programs streets ahead of Notepad.

To be honest, if Notepad coloured my code tags I'd stick with it for almost everything.

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