html book

  esl_webber 11:20 29 Aug 03
Locked

does anyone know of a good html book that will take me through from beginners to more advances - my html is quite basic at the moment
thanks

  Taran 13:07 29 Aug 03

I'd suggest you go to Google and run a search:

"HTML"+tutorial

"web page"+tutorial

and so on.

You can use similar search fields for any topic and the amount of free information out there makes investing in any one book largely an academic matter.

  esl_webber 13:47 29 Aug 03

I understand the concept of searching using google, it is something that I do a lot of the time. I also understand that there is a lot of information on the internet I have been researching different aspects of it for about 6 years now. I am not always sitting at a computer screen with an internet connection and was just interested if anyone had any recommendations, I can find this information out elsewhere, but I generally find that the responses I get here are helpful and posted by people that tend not to patronise, I thought there was an assumed level of understanding in this helproom.

  Talented Monkey 13:58 29 Aug 03

The only problem with using a search engine to look for tutorials is that there are many sites which will be returned that will teach you poor to awful HTML and authoring. If you are going to learn off the web then I found the following sites useful

W3Shools: click here

Web Monkey: click here (please note similarity in name is coincidence and I have nothing to do with this person or site)


A good reference site:
WDVL DJ Quads html reference click here

Unfortunately I am out of touch with books so cant recommend one.

  esl_webber 14:00 29 Aug 03

cheers talented, I'll have a butchers

  zoomer 15:37 29 Aug 03

I found the O Reilly title Web design in a Nutshell good, better than a friends SAMS 24hrs one.........all with the IMHO caveat of course :=)

  esl_webber 15:42 29 Aug 03

cheers zoomer I will have a look.

  Taran 00:55 30 Aug 03

The only ?assumed level of understanding? that the majority of us who regularly answer questions in the forums prefer to adopt is that of a more or less zero knowledge base when people ask a question. Unless the question specifies a certain level of knowledge it is impossible to formulate an appropriate answer.

Not really much point in giving steps A, D, and G when we just assume that the person asking already knows B, C, E, and F.

You asked for ?a good html book that will take me through from beginners to more advances? and I still say your best bet is online research. I agree that some of your findings online will be of questionable worth, but most in the top hits on a Google search will have something very useful to you.

Unlike the inherent limitations of any one volume, you may search the web for specialised subjects, follow rank upon rank of tutorials from absolute beginner to very advanced web programming and also, dare I mention it, get help from forums like this when you come undone. If you prefer printed material, many sites offer their pages as printable reference articles and some of them are worth their weight in gold.

The topic of choosing from the many HTML books is, as I said, largely an academic matter. This is based on a combination of factors: so much information is freely available and what I think is an excellent resource may not agree with your thoughts on the same matter. I have yet to find a single HTML tutorial book that I was entirely happy with which is one of several reasons why I don?t even recommend any individual titles to my students.

No volume I have read truly covers beginner to advanced levels properly ? normally you have to settle for a very significant compromise on one or the other levels, but again, this could just be down to what I think makes a good HTML book may not agree with your own views or, more importantly, your actual needs.

In fact, if you run the first search criteria I suggested, on the first page of returned results you will find the Web Monkey and W3Schools sites mentioned by Talented Monkey, as well as several other very nice resources. I use the W3Schools site as a resource for students on several courses at college.

Imagine how disgruntled you might be if I recommended a book, you went out and bought it, only to find it is not what you had in mind...

  tbh72 03:32 30 Aug 03

click here

This is both online & a Book. It's informative?!

  barryoneoff.co.uk 16:07 30 Aug 03

I have found the 'For Dummies' series quite good for starters.

  esl_webber 09:41 01 Sep 03

taran,
I asked a simple question in the first place, and wanted an answer to that question, if you felt that it was not something that you had the answer to then maybe it was best that you did not answer in the first place.
as far as online turorials/help, I do not spend every second of my life at a computer and do sometimes want to get away from the screen. I understand that they are a resource.
I am also of sound enough mind to make my mind about suggestions that people make, but thought it might be better to ask in this helproom rather than go by what publishers say about their own books.

.....to everyone else, thanks for your help.

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