How do we do....

  pj123 17:58 14 Dec 04

a System Restore in Windows ME.

I know how to do a scanreg /restore in Win 98SE but I am told that ME has a system restore.

I have someone with a problem and the MS Knowledge base advises a system restore but doesn't say how to do it.


  Djohn 18:10 14 Dec 04

Start/settings/control panel and click on the systems Icon then Performance tab, look for the button at the bottom, "File system" then trouble shooting tab and system restore is at the bottom of the window. click here from google for full instructions with graphics.

  lindyloo4 18:42 14 Dec 04

I use to have ME to get to it start/programs/assessories/system tools/system restore if I remember correctly

  Technotiger 18:42 14 Dec 04

Hi, how old is your friends ME? I ask because "Checkpoints created after September 2001 Do Not Restore Your Computer." was a known bug in ME. There is an easy fix, so if this is part of his/her problem email me and I will give you the details. Cheers.

  Technotiger 18:43 14 Dec 04

ps: lindyloo4 is correct. :-)

  spikeychris 18:48 14 Dec 04
  lindyloo4 19:07 14 Dec 04

It was only a few months ago that I used Me and only had problems with Restore twice. On both occassions I disabled it, restarted and enabled it again. Yes, I lost previous restore points but it was working correctly again.

  Technotiger 19:11 14 Dec 04

Herewith, the beauty of this here Forum :-))

  pj123 19:33 14 Dec 04

Thanks everyone. This is something I have been emailed which looks like it came from Stephen Hawking.

"Roll back the clock with System Restore

Theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking writes that each of us carries a personal measure of time dependent on our speed and position in the universe. When you find that your computer isn't working the way it should, you may also find that your personal measure of time has come to a complete stop, and that your productivity has disappeared into a black hole.

With System Restore, Windows Me gives you the power to pull yourself out. This powerful utility will propel you back to a time when your computer was working without incident.

Take a picture
Instead of wading through documentation or waiting for a support technician to devise a fix, System Restore lets you set your computer back to a time when it was working without incident—for example, before you downloaded that Bop the Clown game from the Web site you didn't know anything about. System Restore makes a snapshot of your computer's configurations, files, settings, and data. It then tightly compresses this snapshot and stores it on your hard disk, creating a restore point that you can revert to in times of computer crisis.

System Restore creates a restore point every 10 hours that your computer is on, and every 24 hours of real time. If your computer has been off for more than 24 hours, System Restore will create a restore point when you start up. You can also create your own point manually.

To set up a manual restore point:

Click the Start button.
Point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click System Restore.
Choose Create a restore point, and then click Next.
In the Restore point description box, type a name for your restore point, and then click Next.
Click OK.
Travel through time
Once you have restore points configured, it's easy to revert to them. Don't worry about losing information in recent documents or e-mail messages, as System Restore doesn't alter your personal files. You also have the option of reversing any changes that System Restore makes to your computer.

To restore your computer settings from an earlier time:

Click the Start button.
Point to Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click System Restore.
Choose Restore my computer to an earlier time, and then click Next.
Click a day on the calendar, click the restore point description, and then click Next.
Make sure you have closed all your files and open programs, and then click OK to close the dialog box.
Click Next.
Your system will revert to its previous settings, your time will return to its usual dimensions, and you can go full speed ahead."

Looks pretty good to me so I will give it a try.

Will tick this as resolved.

  pj123 19:36 14 Dec 04

Sorry meant to add.

This is exactly what lindyloo4 has said.

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

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