Hibernate or Sleep? What's the difference?

  AngeTheHippy 11:47 26 Aug 04
Locked

Hi Chaps,
I've recently been told that putting yr PC into Hibernate mode is better than Sleep mode. Now, when I either press the sleep button on the keyboard or goto start/turn off/standby, it goes into sleep mode, and the wake-up key awakens it. I've just looked in control panel/power options/hibernate, and the tic box wasn't ticked, so I've ticked it. So, if I now go to start/turn off/standby, will it in fact hibernate instead of standby/sleep? A bit confused on this one - also, are standby and sleep the same thing? Also, I understand, that MS suggest that sleep shouldn't be used for more than about 40 minutes, whereas hibernate could be for an hour or two. Is this right?

Thanks,

AngeTheHippy
x

  Stuartli 12:46 26 Aug 04

One last several months, the other perhaps overnight...

Hence MS using the terms.

Hibernate (cut and paste to save typing):

Hibernation is when your computer system shuts down to save power, but first saves everything in memory on your hard disk. When restarted, your desktop is restored exactly as you left it. Hibernation is used to save power if or when you are away from the system for an extended time while working.

In the case of Sleep it's really another way of expressing Standby; when you restart the system by using the mouse or a key stroke, you bring it out of a "Sleep" mode.

  AngeTheHippy 13:17 26 Aug 04

yeah, thanks for this - so, if your PC is powered up for 18 hours a day for eg., but you're not always sitting in front of it (!) but go back periodically to see whether mail has arrived, PCAdvisor posts replied to etc., would you put it in hibernation? Am I right in thinking that hibernation is a 'safer' bet than sleep?

ATH

  Stuartli 13:28 26 Aug 04

That would seem to be the case.

  Graham ® 13:38 26 Aug 04

In sleep/standby, information is not saved to the hard drive. If there is an interruption to the power, data will be lost.

  Stuartli 13:51 26 Aug 04

That's made clear in my first posting...:-)

  jack 14:00 26 Aug 04

This is interesting because my m/c has been doing a'something' since I upgraded a month or so ago .
I thought this good i'll leaveit like it, but now i am confused
should I.?
What happens is as discussed above if left the m/c powers down, nothing running, the mous/keyboard will not arouse it then if the power button is pressed it springs to life the scan bar rushes a across the screen and the screen comes up just I left it.
When I retire at night/early a.m. I simply power off at the wall, next day power up the wall the box and there I \m as it was last night.
Is this good or bad?

  temp003 14:04 26 Aug 04

If your computer or keyboard has a Sleep button, it can be either Standby or Hibernate, although I think by default it is set to standby. You should be able to configure it in Power Options as Standby or Hibernate (once you have enabled Hibernate support). "When I press the sleep button on my computer ..."

Also, once you have enabled Hibernate support, your shutdown menu should include an option to hibernate as well. You just choose standby or hibernate. You can also set the computer automatically to go into standby/hibernation after a certain time of inactivity, in Power Options.

As Graham says, when in standby, information is not saved to hard disk, but stays in memory, your RAM (which still requires power). In Hibernation, info is saved to hard disk, which I suppose is safer. Hibernation support always reserves an amount of disk space equal to your RAM.

Generally, for longer periods of inactivity, use Hibernate. Standby for shorter periods. For laptops running on batteries, hibernate is better.

  Graham ® 14:12 26 Aug 04

Shutting down by turning off the power is not good. Windows likes to go through a shutdown process to protect itself.

  jack 14:41 26 Aug 04

jack
Shutting down by turning off the power is not good. Windows likes to go through a shutdown process to protect itself.

Even ifit is already 'knocked out' so to speak?

  Graham ® 14:57 26 Aug 04

Depends what you mean by knocked out. You said you simply powered off at the wall socket, so it would still be running?

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