Help!! I Need A Chemist...

  johndrew 19:06 20 Jun 06
Locked

Not the high street variety, I should add, but one of those who is up on their adhesives.

I have a commercial DVD which has some cyanoacrylate (superglue/Loctite) on the playing surface - clever me for mixing DVDs with other work!! The question is, can it be removed with any solvent that will not attack the DVD itself?

I`m sure that there is someone out there with enough knowledge to advise me on a recovery method if it`s possible.

Thanks in anticipation.

  Confab 19:10 20 Jun 06

Isopropanol is your best bet.

click here

  SANTOS7 19:14 20 Jun 06

click here
click here

these may help (apart from sandpaper suggested in first link)..

  €dstowe 19:15 20 Jun 06

Acetone or 2-butanone (MEK) is used in A&E departments for loosening skin stuck with cyanoacrylates but I'm sure that won't do the DVD any good at all.

  Catastrophe 01:08 21 Jun 06

click here

IPA?? Don't think so. But then I am only a chemist - not an optimist.

;)

  stlucia 12:40 21 Jun 06

I use cyanoacrylate for model making, and I'm aware that you can buy cyano remover from model shops. Here's an example click here

I haven't used it, and I don't know what its chemical constituents are.

On the other hand, cyano is not waterproof, so a prolonged soaking in soapy water might be your best and safest bet.

  amonra 13:36 21 Jun 06

I agree with stlucia put the disk into a bowl of soapy water (soap, not detergent) and go down the pub for a few hours. It may take some time but it will come off.

  Catastrophe 14:07 21 Jun 06

If I were you I would try acetone which is commonly used in nail polish removers.

  Catastrophe 14:12 21 Jun 06

Just noticed £dstowe is concerned about acetone. Try it first on a 'coaster' to be sure.

  anchor 14:27 21 Jun 06

€dstowe is correct; Acetone or MEK, (Methyl Ethyl Ketone), is worth trying.

However, as already stated, what the effect might be on a DVD I have no idea. As Catastrophe suggests, try it on a disposable one first.

I doubt Isopropanol will do anything.

  johndrew 14:49 21 Jun 06

I guess the best advice is soapy water and a trip to the pub!! I like the latter anyway!!

Seriously it does appear that I should avoid solvents and as for any mechanical means, well my hand is not as steady as it once was. I really do not want to damage the DVD as it probably isn`t replaceable.

All I can say is that I`m glad DVDs are plastic as at least they are unlikely to corrode in soapy water as quickly as some metallic materials.

Thanks again for all your help.

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