FLAT SCREEN RESOLUTIONS

  bpzoom 17:44 20 Dec 10
Locked

My computer is a gradual build over several years and is presently a low spec by modern standards but perfectly adequate for my use. Although I have ceased adding to its spec, I would like a flat screen display for space reasons. My graphics thingy on the motherboard allows a maximum resolution of 1280 x 1024. Without going to the bother and cost of adding a higher spec graphics card, can anyone tell me please, do the limitations of my current graphics resolution prevent me from successfully using a modern flat screen display of say 19" with a stated maximum resolution higher than my maximum? I hope this is not a stupid question but I suppose I am asking if modern displays must be or are normally used at their stated maximum resolution?

  GaT7 17:58 20 Dec 10

Yes, if your graphics card (GPU for short) can only do max of 1280*1024, going for a 19" widescreen TFT will need either 1440*900 or 1600*900 at its native resolution - this is when everything is at its sharpest on a modern flat-screen, & is the recommended resolution to use it at.

But you never know with newer drivers. I'm using an old ATI Radeon 7000 on one of my PCs & it can go up to 1920*1200 on a 24" TFT monitor. And so can an integrated GPU do on another.

Start by telling us your GPU make & model - we may be able to find out if its capable of those resolutions or not. If not, we can suggest an alternative. G

  GaT7 18:03 20 Dec 10

I should have also mentioned that a non-widescreen 19" will most likely have a native resolution of 1280*1024, so you should be OK with one of those if they're still available to buy these days. G

  bpzoom 18:10 20 Dec 10

Thank you. It is an INTEL(R) Extreme Graphics 2 with a driver date of around 2005. There is a newer driver available dated 2007 which allows a higher resolution, but my mate looked at the Intel site download small print which said they do the driver for Windows 7 but not for XP ! The previous (before mine) was for Windows ME.

  bpzoom 18:13 20 Dec 10

Sorry forgot to add INTEL (R) 82865G Graphics Controller.

  GaT7 18:27 20 Dec 10

Yes, a 2005 driver version appears to be the latest for XP & your GPU click here, but no mention of supported resolutions in the release notes.

Another search says that drivers for Win7 are actually not available for your GPU click here & they have no plans for releasing any either click here (my integrated GPU is a little newer, so has support for Win7).

Do you have an AGP/PCI-E slot on your motherboard? Or even a spare PCI slot? You could get a suitable GPU if you do. G

  bpzoom 19:54 20 Dec 10

Thank you for confirming that. I think there is a spare PCI slot. Before I think about adding a card I will take up your other suggestion that i.e " a non-widescreen 19" will most likely have a native resolution of 1280*1024, so you should be OK with one of those if they're still available to buy these days." Many thanks for your help. B.

  GaT7 20:10 20 Dec 10

Do check the specs closely of the ones you'll be considering though. For best results, its "native" resolution (not supported resolution) needs to be 1280*1024.

I'd recommend a widescreen one, but if it means adding a GPU that will take it past your budget, I suppose a 4:3 one will have to do for now. G

  bpzoom 22:31 20 Dec 10

Many, many thanks indeed for all your excellent advice. By 4:3 I guess you mean not wide screen. I will have a poke around and see what is available. Have a great Christmas and thanks again.

  GaT7 23:21 20 Dec 10

"By 4:3 I guess you mean not wide screen."

Yes, that's right. The most common widescreen aspect rations are 16:10 & 16:9.

I forgot to mention earlier that some 19" widescreen monitors come with a native resolution of 1368*768 (16:9). (Not that it makes any difference really!)

"Have a great Christmas and thanks again."

You're welcome, & I wish you the same as well :-), G

  bpzoom 23:25 20 Dec 10

Sorry to come back again, but I have gone through the specs of 13 appropriate displays all stocked by BT as it happens, but none mention "native" resolution at all. They all just say maximum resolution.

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