Ferrite Coil

  NotsoNewuser 16:57 04 Dec 04

Have just bought a Chieftec BX case and amongst the bits & pieces is a small ferrite coil.
I dont know precisely where in the case this should go - can anyone tell me please -- and keep it clean.

  SurfMonkey _#:@}™ 17:00 04 Dec 04

I have one of those between the power on switch on the front of the tower and the mother board with the power wires looped through

  Gongoozler 17:08 04 Dec 04

Is this an actual coil with wire on it, or just the ferrite bead?

  NotsoNewuser 21:19 04 Dec 04

Its a solid metal ring of 25mm diam and 10mm thickness. One of the store adverts describes it as a ferrite coil.

Perhaps this is it as I believe it has something to do with electromagnetism reduction but would like to be sure.

  woodchip 21:38 04 Dec 04

Yes it's not a coil only a ferrite bobin they help to clean a signal. your computer will work without it

  g0nvs 21:45 04 Dec 04

This Ferrite ring is used to eliminate RF interference getting to your PC.It should be connected As SurfMonkey _#:@}™ says.Most monitor & PC tower cables are fitted with RF Chokes, look for the "chunky bit" near the end of the mains lead.

  Valvegrid 21:51 04 Dec 04

Does it look like one of these?

click here

It usually goes in the power lead, a few turns of the power lead is wound on the ring, although the computer will work OK with out it, its likely to interfere with other devices like radios if its not used, so it should be used.

  Gongoozler 10:25 05 Dec 04

As other contributors have said, the ring is there to help reduce RF interference. Where it will do the most good depends on the installation. I think it is more likely that the case manufacturer intended the wires to the front panel to go through it; the power supply should already have all the RF cleaning it needs. The way the ferrite ring works is that if a signal through the outgoing wire is balanced by that through the return (earth) wire, there is no net current and the ring has no effect. If the signal isn't balanced because some leaks to earth elsewhere, then the residual current is suppressed by the ring. Most of the computer case is well screened, but the leads to the front panel pass through the screening and provide a source of EMI (Electromagnetic Interference) to other equipment. In a domestic situation with only one computer this is unlikely to be a serious problem, but in a commercial installation there may be many hundreds of computers and the EMI problem could be significant. EMI regulations are quite stringent and manufacturers have to demonstrate compliance to be able to put a CE marking on their equipment and sell it in the EEC.

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