Ethernet Crossover cables.

  Rickyc88 19:35 18 Jul 04
Locked

i am going to install a small network in my home with two computers. i have seem pages on the web about using crossover cables. with the use of this will i be able to share the internet connection and printers?

Also, i am a bit confused about the cables i need to buy. is there a high street retailer(UK) that sells crossover cables? i ve searched and all i have found are "patch" cables and there are males/female, red/grey cables to deal with! what one is suitable and any help is appreciated!

thanks

  Some-Guy 20:10 18 Jul 04

Most shops should sell crossover, if you ask them they will tell you. Also if you are using this type of networking, one computer must be switched on for the internet connection sharing to work which will act as a server and a printer can also be shared.

  Podsville 21:40 18 Jul 04

Maplin's for two network (NIC) cards and 8mtr crossover cable in one box "Sitecom Networking Kit" simple to install and works a treat for me about £15.
Also PC World sell crossover cable of various lengths.
Cheers P

  Rickyc88 10:59 19 Jul 04

what are patch cables? they are much cheaper?

  papa lazarous 11:08 19 Jul 04

Patch cable are wired differently inside and are used to connect PCs to Hubs/Routers/Wall Points etc. You have to use a crossover if you are going PC to PC.
For better results though get a router and plug your PCs into it.

  SEASHANTY 11:28 19 Jul 04

Patch cables are straight thru RJ45 cat5 cables. For an illustrated description of the differences see click here

  SEASHANTY 11:33 19 Jul 04

If you use a router you will need straight thru
RJ45 Cat5 UTP cables (same as patch) NOT Crossover.

  Rickyc88 11:30 22 Jul 04

would you guys know if 20m of crossover cable will fit a normal terraced house from downstairs dining room to one of the bedrooms?

what prices are we looking at? is there a quality difference in them?

  bellportal 11:55 22 Jul 04

Firstly, don't be afraid to measure the distance of cable required, and always get an extra 5m on what you think you will need, just in case!

Crossover cables are more expensive than patch cables because they are wired differently and do not require the use of a hub/switch/router. If you just want to connect two boxes together and have no plans to expand, then pick crossover cables.

If, on the other hand, you want to connect these boxes and possibly upgrade in the future (go wireless, add more machines) then the best thing to do is purchase a switch (if you want to share broadband, then buy a broadband router for top performance) and two patch cables. Plug one end of each cable into the machine and the other end into the switch or router. You will then need to set the machines up. If you have xp, using the home or small office networking wizard - it is good for the beginner.

BUT - if you want to network a computer from the upstairs to the downstairs and plan to have more networked computers on both levels, buy two switches - one for the top and one for the bottom - plug all the upstairs machines into the upstairs switch and the downstairs machines into the downstairs switch. Then purchase one patch cable which will run the distance between the two switches. Plug one end of this cable into the 'Uplink' port on the upstairs switch and the other end into one of the numbered ports on the downstairs switch. This way, if you have four machines upstairs, four downstairs, and only one switch downstairs you have to run four cables from the upstairs. This way you only have to run one - cool or what!!

  byfordr 13:26 22 Jul 04

You might want to look at a wireless network (unless you like tripping over cables)

£15 for 20m click here
(CAT5 suitable for 10/100 network)

click here
(CAT6 suitable for 10/100/1000 network)

R

  SEASHANTY 15:42 22 Jul 04

Cheap network cables 20M UTP RJ45 Cat5e GREY for
£6 says free delivery click here

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