ECP, EPP, standard port: Info please

  Motmas 01:22 06 Aug 03
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I know what the acronyms stand for, but what do they mean exactly? In what way are these various printer ports different from each other? How do you tell which is/are available on a particular PC?

  JIM 02:12 06 Aug 03

How do you tell which is/are available on a particular PC?
Go into the bios at bootup.

Many people believe that if they get a 1284 port with EPP or ECP that they will automatically get the benefit of faster printing. Unfortunately, this is not true.

In order to get faster printing three things must be present:
1- the parallel port must be capable of operating in the ECP mode,
2- there must be a port driver present that knows HOW to operate in the mode, and most important,
3- the printer (or peripheral) must be designed to operate in this mode.

Not all printers, and actually only a few of the newer ones, can operate in one of these advanced modes.

also,

click here

  DieSse 08:26 06 Aug 03

Both Epson and HP recommend that for their printers, the port is set to ECP mode.

  pj123 16:58 06 Aug 03

The printer ports are set in the BIOS. You have four options: Standard, which is SPP - EPP, ECP and EPP+ECP. All they do is give you feed back from your printer. Like how much ink you have left etc... SPP gives no feedback at all. My printer is set for EPP+ECP.

  Motmas 23:21 07 Aug 03

From Motmas to Jim, DieSse and pj123. Many thanks for your replies, I'll now digest all that and do some experimenting. As well as enabling responses from the printer re ink levels etc, the speed of communication seems to be one of the important distinguishing features of the various ports, assuming of course that you have all three essentials to use them as clarified by Jim.

  TC27 21:07 06 Mar 05

It may be helpful to know that EPP & ECP stand for Enhanced & Extended Capabilities Port. If enabled (in bios) they allow 'Bi-Directional Support,' which includes running 2 different peripherals, eg. scanner, printer from the same port - allowing full 'data talk back' to the computer. In some bios, you may have to highlight the 'Normal' setting &, in a lot of today's computers, confidently select 'EPP+ECP,' together, (using page up/down keys to find). (Press F10, then y & enter to save settings & exit).

  TC27 21:09 06 Mar 05

It may be helpful to know that EPP & ECP stand for Enhanced & Extended Capabilities Port. If enabled (in bios) they allow 'Bi-Directional Support,' which includes running 2 different peripherals, eg. scanner, printer from the same port - allowing full 'data talk back' to the computer. In some bios, you may have to highlight the 'Normal' setting &, in a lot of today's computers, confidently select 'EPP+ECP,' together, (using page up/down keys to find). (Press F10, then y & enter to save settings & exit).

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