Dual dual hard drive, master/slave arrangement

  kro 01:52 05 Dec 05
Locked

After looking through several posts on this and other forums it seems that everybody that operates with two hard drives has they smaller drive as the master and the larger as the slave. Is there any reasoning behind this?

I have two hard drives, but I have the larger as the master with three partitions separating the operating system (XP pro, Sp2 etc) from the installed program files and my files and folders (documents, media etc.), while using my smaller, slave as a backup for my files.

Can anyone advise me which arrangement, if any, is better and why?

Thanks

  Djohn 02:37 05 Dec 05

No, entirely up to you how you arrange them. Many people start off with just one drive then buy a larger drive at a later date. This will explain why the O/S is on the smaller of the two drives, but of course there will be other reasons as well.

If I was to reformat a system with two drives, I think I would separate the smaller drive into two partitions, anything upto 10Gb for the operating system and drivers required for hardware then a similar or slightly larger partition for all the applications such as Office etc.

Second or slave drive would be in two or three partitions, first one for a backup of everything on the C: drive then two partitions for all my data.

There are no hard and fast rules for this and many members will have their own preference, some with the opinion that with modern machines and operating systems there is no need to partition a large drive and in fact better not to. You can also mix drives of different speeds on the same IDE channel and the IDE controller will let each drive run at its respective speed.

So, some people will have their master hard drive and one optical drive on one channel then their second or slave drive on the other channel with another optical drive.

  kro 11:52 05 Dec 05

Thanks for that Djohn.

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