Dual Boot - primary or logical

  Pete_W 07:41 02 Aug 04
Locked

Any one know what the pros & cons of having the second boot on primary or logical partitions ara?

  temp003 08:55 02 Aug 04

It may depend on what OS's you're dual booting and what software you're using.

Presumably the OS's will be on the same hard disk?

If you're going to set up the dual boot using XP's native dual boot function, it doesn't really matter either way, because the computer will still be booting up from the C partition.

  Pete_W 17:44 02 Aug 04

Hi temp,
ME on primary & XP Home on the logical.
The reason I ask is that I had problems booting into XP (last weeks "Boot missing .dll" thread)after restoring a PQ drive image. That problem may be due to not realizing I created a logical rather than a primary partition to restore to?
Anyway after reinstalling XP cleanly I find it much more stable than it was on the primary... is there a reason for this?
The only disadvantage I've found is that PQ boot for windows can only boot straight into a primary sited OS.

  Pete_W 17:47 02 Aug 04

In addition to previous...
ME is C:\ & XP is I:Previously both OSs were C:\ & invisible to each other... now XP can see the C:\ directorys.

  temp003 19:06 02 Aug 04

I don't know exactly why your restored image didn't work. Normally, although an OS does not have to be on a primary partition, its boot files must be.

It may be that if your original dual boot was set up in a way that each OS booted up from its own partition (each partition having its own boot files for the OS in question), then the XP restored image couldn't boot up because the boot files are not on a primary partition. Just a guess.

Anyway, it seems (you haven't made it very clear) that you are now using XP's native daul boot function?

If it works well, I would stick with it. Frankly it's simpler.

If your current setup is what I think it is, all your boot files (for both OS's) are on C.

In My Computer, Tools, Folder Options, View tab, tick Show hidden files and folders, untick Hide file extensions, untick Hide protected operating system files, say yes to the warning, and click OK. Then go to C (where ME is installed).

If you see the files ntldr, ntdetect.com, boot.ini and bootsect.dos on C, then you are using XP's native dual boot.

You can create a boot floppy for your current dual boot. Go into XP, insert floppy, right click Drive A, Format, click Start (do not tick any of the options). After formatting, copy the 4 files from C to the floppy. Remove and label it. This serves as a backup of the dual boot files, and as a bootable floppy. If you restart computer with the floppy inserted, you will get back the dual boot menu. Useful when the boot files on the hard disk have become corrupted or accidentally lost.

  Pete_W 21:09 02 Aug 04

Thanks for the info temp. I agree I am now on XPs built in dual boot manager. It definately seems more stable so I will run it in this way... saves me upgrading a computer that doesn't get much use!

  Pete_W 21:09 02 Aug 04

Thanks for the info temp. I agree I am now on XPs built in dual boot manager. It definately seems more stable so I will run it in this way... saves me upgrading a computer that doesn't get much use!

  Pete_W 21:09 02 Aug 04

Thanks for the info temp. I agree I am now on XPs built in dual boot manager. It definately seems more stable so I will run it in this way... saves me upgrading a computer that doesn't get much use!

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