This doesn't sound right to me...

  Kate B 12:09 07 Mar 03
Locked

We've got a new nannyish security policy at work and I was told I can't use my Bluetooth dongle to sync my PDA because "with the right mobile and Bluetooth, you could bypass the firewall".

I may be wrong, but I think the puffed-up-with-power network geek thinks I've got Wifi ... Can you indeed circumvent a corporate firewall with Bluetooth and a mobile?

  Lozzy 12:12 07 Mar 03

Have a look here.. click here

  Kate B 12:22 07 Mar 03

Lozzy thanks for the link - not that I understood much of it ...? Please would you translate for me? I speak reasonable geek, but not Network Geek...thanks!

  Aspman 12:40 07 Mar 03

It probably can be done but you would need to be able to reconfigure your machine to use the connection through the phone rather than your network. If your network is as restictive as it sounds you probably dont have the access rights to make the changes anyway.

Sounds unreasonable to me, I'd have a quiet word with the network manager and explain your situation.

  Kate B 12:49 07 Mar 03

Aspman, you wouldn't believe how restrictive it is - I've spent the past few days in demented screaming harpy mode trying to get the ability to do minor things like change my homepage ...

perhaps most annoyingly, they've even imposed a "corporate" colour scheme on Lotus Notes, a horrible piece of software at the best of times. You should see a Notes inbox with alternate salmon-pink and white stripes ... it makes the red of unread messages almost unreadable. And to change the default miniscule point size in Notes, you have to get a geek down to edit the .ini file...

I've tried the quiet word, and I've tried demented shrieking serial emailer. Next step is to try buying a friendly geek a beer.

  €dstow 13:12 07 Mar 03

It seems like you've got a geek department full of power crazy fools. I could just imagine the reaction of my staff if I imposed such unreasonable restrictions on their computer use. Yes, I certainly do put restrictions on what can and cannot be done on my machines but I like to think that I am fair in this and if anyone has any complaints, I am happy to listen and change my mind if necessary.

If you have a real cause for complaint, take your grievance to someone who matters rather than someone who seems to be a power crazy jobsworth.

€d

  Kate B 13:29 07 Mar 03

€dstow, you should hear the howls coming from some users. Most don't know how locked down they are, but there's a group of us who know what we're doing with PCs and have been screaming loud and long.

More irritatingly, I've established that I've been told a porky by the 12-year-old ubergeek who came down and PATTED MY ARM yesterday (grrr). I also suspect he's talking rubbish about the security threat from Bluetooth, given its limited range and functionality. It's not like Wifi!

  €dstow 13:37 07 Mar 03

If it's a lot of you against one, you have a very powerful weapon there. You shouldn't have to put up with it (unless he's the bosses son!!). It seems that unreasonable restrictions are being imposed and if I were you I would get something done about it quick - before he causes some real damage - if not to the machines, then to the business.

€d

  GANDALF <|:-)> 13:44 07 Mar 03

Give your IT dept. a nervous breakdown by casually mentioning that you keep seeing messages from a thing called 'too leaky' and as an off-hand swipe impishly ask what Back Orifice, by The Cult of the Dead Cow, is. Guaranteed to cause apoplexy

To intercept info from a 'dongle' you would have to have the mad skillz of a top hacker as the frequency and more importantly, the range, is severely limited. Most of the 'I am a dongle hacker' exploits are the result of too much coffee and industrial quantities of Coca-Cola (original). If you were that good, intercepting dongles would be bottom of a rather long list of must dos.

G

  Kate B 14:26 07 Mar 03

Gandalf, you are leading me astray ... tempting, very tempting. And thanks for the input about the dongle, that's rather what I thought - that Bluetooth has too limited a range and too limited a functionality to allow demented hackers access to the network (or "notwork" as it's fondly known).

€dstow, the real damage won't be to the PCs or even to the business (goodness knows, that's in a bad enough state) - it will be to the powercrazed ubergeek if he pats my arm again ...

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