Do I buy Office 2003 or 2007?

  renard 23:07 11 Nov 08
Locked

I have just bought a new PC for my adult daughter and her two children, aged 6 and 8.

I now need to get word processing etc to install on this PC.

At school, the children are being taught on Office 2003.

If I get Office 2007, are they likely to become confused between school (2003) and home (2007), bearing in mind their ages?

Or should I confidently install the later version (2007), rather than something five years old?

Unfortunately, I do not know how the two versions compare and I don't want the kids to suffer from the wrong choice, as they are just learning how to use computers.

Also: I am aware of the cheap student versions of 2007, but can anyone please advise the "best" (cheapest!!) source of 2003, in case I have to get that version?

Any advice will be greatly appreciated.

  MAT ALAN 23:14 11 Nov 08

I would go for office 2003 you need a compatability pack to run 2003 apps. in 2007


click here

  mgmcc 07:49 12 Nov 08

>>> I would go for office 2003 you need a compatability pack to run 2003 apps. in 2007

Isn't it the other way round. You need to install the compatibility pack in 2003 to be able to use the 2007 format files such as .DOCX and .XLSX?

2007 will function natively with the earlier file formats.

  jaritch 08:31 12 Nov 08

Hi Renard
I don't think your kids will have a problem working between the two different versions although 2007 has a different interface. They are pretty adaptable at any age. I suppose the reason that I suggest 2007 is that it is newer software and if you have a child at school you can get the full 2007 package for less than £50 at click here

  Migwell 08:36 12 Nov 08

Leave Office 2007 where is deserves to be, on the shelf. I tried it and found it so bad to find the things i needed I went back to Office 2003. It is to confusing with if you have ever used an earlier version.

  ventanas 09:04 12 Nov 08

Tell me about it, I've two machines on my desk here at work, one with XP and Office 2003, the other with Vista and Office 2007. The differences with the operating systems aside there are also great differences between the two versions of Office. After months of use I'm still finding where things are in 2007.
I suppose if I'd just been using the one version I would have cracked it by now, and when all said and done, 2007 is probably the way things will go in the future, and perhaps some attention should be given to that.
Personally I would want to know why my childrens' school is using five year old, out of date software.

  birksy 14:15 12 Nov 08

Office 2003, will require enormous downloads to fix weaknesses in its security. If memory serves, about 30Mb, so I hope you are on broadband.

Still rather have 2003 with updates, than 2007 though.

  scotty 14:24 12 Nov 08

My suggested answer to your question - No.

Open Office will provide all the facilities they will need. It is very similar to Microsoft Office so they should easily adapt to the differences. You have nothing to loose by trying it (free download) and you could save quite a few £s.

  LastChip 16:17 12 Nov 08

Children of that age are *completely* adaptable. They will take to Open Office like ducks to water and use MS Office at school.

You can save oo documents in MSOffice format, so the two are interchangeable.

It is not necessary to spend vast sums on MSOffice any more.

All computers I set up now go with oo installed.

The only reasons schools still use MSOffice is because:

a. It's what their used to

b. Microsoft offer massive discounts for schools to maintain their stranglehold.

c. It's normally part of a pre-installation by RM.

  johnincrete 17:06 12 Nov 08

If school is using Word then Open Office docs need to be saved as Word if you want to red then at school.

  jarani 21:10 12 Nov 08

my granddaughter used WinXP and Office 03
she switched to Vista and Office 07
on her laptop with her School at 14

she is very pleased / impressed
and would not wish to go back

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