Connecting Nikon P3/P4 Wi-fi Camera to my Network

  first500 19:21 20 Jun 06
Locked

I have followed all the steps, yet it still won't connect! I have a simple infrastructure set up with a Netgear Router a desktop PC and laptop PC. I am trying to connect the camera to the desktop via the router.

I have reduced the security to MAC address authentication (no WEP etc), but the camera refuses to connect. It is recognised when connected by USB cable for setting up the profile which is Infrastructure/Open Security/Automatic IP address.

The profile name is the name I have given to the computer, and is the one that comes up as default when setting up the camera profile with the Wireless Connection software.

Tried Peer to Peer and manually allocating IP address, but still nothing.

Any suggestions as to what is causing the camera to be unable to connect?

  ade.h 20:24 20 Jun 06

Please stick to one thread.

  first500 21:58 20 Jun 06

ade.h - As I had mistyped Nokia instead of Nikon, the moderator agreed to delete the old thread, as I should start a new one. Sorry if any confusion caused.

  ade.h 22:00 20 Jun 06

Oh, I see! No worries.

  ade.h 22:06 20 Jun 06

The more I ponder this issue, the less I hope I have of it working correctly. It seems like Nikon has had to come up with some software to make two devices - a router and a camera - talk to each other, when they were not orignially conceived for this purpose. In fact, I can't see what influence the software can really have, given that it's on one of your other clients and therefore not acting between the camera and the router; conventional wireless links do not require software (despite such software often being supplied anyway). How does this profile work and what is it supposed to achieve?

  first500 22:41 20 Jun 06

ade.h I am no expert, but it seems that by putting in the profile into the camera (via usb cable) this creates an emulation of a peripheral, so that when connected, the pc sees the camera as a connected device (like a scanner). The profile requires all the usual things for a wireless device - Type of encryption, ad-hoc or infrastructure, channel (for ad-hoc), Ip address (manual or automatic) etc. Can't see what can go wrong, but you know wireless networking....

  ade.h 23:03 20 Jun 06

Yeah, I can imagine it as a way of controlling the images as they come in from the router. The camera is not necessarily going to behave in quite the same way as a "normal" network client. (Which doesn't help!)

If you're anything like me, you won't like being beaten by these things, but it's possible that you may have to admit defeat and use USB as normal!

Best of luck with it anyway!

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