Changing graphics card in XP Home

  Jim Sadler 14:25 06 Sep 03
Locked

I am about to change the nVidia G-Force 4 Ti 4200 graphics card in my computer for a Radeon 9600. The reason for this is the nVidia card, even with the Microsoft signed updated drivers from the Windows Update site, crashes the computer when I try to test the Open GL and 3D settings in the DIRECTX (dxdiag) window.
I would appreciate advice on the best way to un-install the nVidia drivers without having Windows re-install them on system restart.
Jim Sadler

  hugh-265156 14:34 06 Sep 03

download click here

remove the drivers via add/remove programs as normal,boot into safe mode and click cancel when xp prompts to install the drivers.run driver and cab cleaner.

click control panel/system/hardware/device manager,right click your nvidia card and remove it.shut down the computer,insert the new card,when prompted to install the drivers,click cancel twice and get the latest ones from click here

  Jester2K II 14:35 06 Sep 03

1) Remove drivers using Add / Remove Programs in Control Panel.

2) Switch the PC off.

3) Remove old card and install new.

4) Restart PC and install New card drivers.

Done

  Jim Sadler 18:37 07 Sep 03

huggyg71 & Jester2K
Many thanks, Folks, for your advice. I'll let you both know how things progress.
Jim Sadler

  Jim Sadler 17:21 08 Sep 03

Orange message bar says 'Contact Moderator'. Who's the 'moderator'?
Anyway, Folks, I un-installed trhe drivers etc. for the nVidia card, shut down the PC, changed the cards over, and guess what, no picture at all.
I plugged my CRT monitor into the analogue socket of the new Radeon card, no picture at all and the power button indicated no signal. I then connected my TFT flat panel to the DVI socket of the card and, again, no picture and no signal.
On changing back to the nVidia card I again have a picture on either monitor.
Any suggestions, please.

  Wobby 18:00 08 Sep 03

I'm pretty certain that most new ATI cards need to have a power cable plugged onto them for additional power for them to work. Can you check your card for a power connector, probably the same size connector as your floppy drive. If it doesn't have one, or if you already have power going into it I would say your new card is faulty.

  Rayuk 18:11 08 Sep 03

Best if you post specs including power supply.

Did you try removing then reinstalling card to make sure it was right in sometimes a little force is needed.

  Jim Sadler 09:13 09 Sep 03

Wobby. Thanks for your suggestion.The card does not have a separate power input socket. The card could be faulty.

Rayuk. Thanks for your advice. I tried alternating the nVidia and Radeon cards 4 times. The specs for my machine are an Abit KT7 RAID motherboard (the RAID is not used) and an Athlon 900Mhz Thunderbird processor together with 768mb of 133 RAM. The Award BIOS has been updated to version A9 and the AGP setting is x4, the highest available and adequate according to the card manufacturer. Fast write is not enabled. The VIA chipset has been updated through the VIA 4-1 download to the maximum advisable for the KT7 motherboard. The PSU output is 400 watts and my whole system runs through a Belkin 650 UPS.

  Jester2K II 09:20 09 Sep 03

"Contact Moderator" - click this to send a message to the Moderator (the all seeing eye that watches over the boards) Do not use it use you have to. For complaining about someone thread or posting of offensive etc....

Don't mis-use it..

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