Bootable CD'S

  Arokh. 19:12 05 Feb 04
Locked

I would like to create a Bootable CD, but I don't know how to.
I was thinking of putting it on one of those small CD'S, that are used for Minidisks, it has a capacity of 185MB, would that be enough?

Please Advise
Thank you, Regards Arokh

  Dazwm 19:20 05 Feb 04

What sort of bootable cd - what will it used for?

  Arokh. 19:29 05 Feb 04

A Bootable CD for Windows XP Professional, you see, the other day I had a virus, it deleted all but a few obscure Fonts, and I was unable to read any text on my pc, either documents or Windows itself, I had to reinstall Win XP on top of itself, a very difficult job to do, since I did not have the right Administration Password.

  temp003 08:15 06 Feb 04

If you don't already have the XP installation CD, you will at least need the XP installation folder i386, which is on some OEM computers (but not all). Search your computer for i386. There are other folders also called i386, and the one you need is the one with certain subfolders, such as LANG, COMPDATA, ASMS. If you don't have such an i386 folder, you can't create an XP CD.

Even if you have the right folder, it may not always succeed, but you can try.

In addition to the i386 folder, you need certain extra files, win51, win51IP, and the CD boot sector (which has a .bin extension). These files can be downloaded from the web.

There are numerous sites which explain how to create the XP bootable CD, such as click here (where the 3 extra files you need can be downloaded - winxp10.zip) or click here

The first site gives you utilities which automate many of the processes for you (the utilities will build an ISO image of the CD for you, you then only need to burn the ISO image to CD without having to fuss about the boot sector and so on). The second site (and many others) gives you instructions to do it manually.

Most of them deal with creating an XP CD with SP1 or SP1a integrated into the CD. Make sure you make a copy of the i386 folder and use the copy for creating the CD. Don't slipstream anything into the original folder in case anything goes wrong.

If you don't want to integrate SP1, just ignore the instructions dealing with SP1.

You will need to digest the instructions yourself, but in summary, if you don't want to slipstream SP1 or SP1a, all you need to do is

(1) create a new folder on your computer called, say, cdroot

(2) copy the i386 folder there under the folder cdroot

(3) copy the files win51 and win51IP also to the cdroot

The cdroot folder now has all the files you need for the bootable CD. What you see inside the cdroot folder is what you will see on the bootable CD if you look at it in Windows Explorer.

The next step is to burn the contents of the cdroot folder to a CD AND create a bootable CD using the .bin file. Here you must follow the instructions closely. Find a site which gives you instructions on how to burn the CD which uses your burning software (and version number) such as Nero, Roxio, CDRWIN.

If you can get so far, use a CDRW to try it out first.

If you succeed in making the bootable CD, you should still need to enter the CD or product key during installation. Look at the outside of your computer case or the stuff that came with the computer to see if you have one.

Size of CD - that would be the last of your worry. It is unlikely an XP Pro CD can be smaller than 185MB. My slipstreamed Windows 2000 pro CD is 270MB. XP Pro is bound to be larger. You can delete a number of subfolders under the copy of the i386 folder, but I wouldn't bother. Just create (if you can) an ordinary CD.

  DieSse 09:26 06 Feb 04

click here One of many such articles - available from a Google search ... how to make a bootable CD ...

"I was thinking of putting it on one of those small CD'S, that are used for Minidisks, it has a capacity of 185MB, would that be enough?"

Enough for what?

  Arokh. 15:04 06 Feb 04

Hi DieSse, the minidisk would be the Win XP Bootable disk.

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