bios rom checksum error

  birkdalite 08:40 14 Dec 03
Locked

Three times in the last two days half way through
post I get the following message and my pc shuts down.------Bios rom checksum error. detecting floppy drive'a' media INSERT SYSTEM DISK AND PRESS ENTER. Only by restarting several times until "something clicked" was I able to use the pc. Is this some known standard error,or could it be related to the fact that despite loading my Epson 925 printer with setup disk and using it without problems windows XP keeps "finding new hardware epson925"and asking for disk and when I cancel tells me hardware will not work correctly---which it does.I am now scared to switch off in case it conks again, so all all help gratefully received.

  Gongoozler 09:31 14 Dec 03

Hi birkdalite. A BIOS ROM checksum error means that the when BIOS tests the ROM for data integrity during POST, it has found an error. What the checksum is, is a figure that it stores, and it performs a mathematical process on all the ROM data, and compares the result with the checksum. If the two numbers agree, then the stored data hasn't been corrupted. If the numbers don't agree, then there is an error in the data. Unfortunately the only way of changing the data in the ROM is by flashing it. If your motherboard supports floppy disk BIOS booting, then you can flash the BIOS ROM even if the data has been corrupted. I notice that this facility is now included in ASUS motherboards. On other motherboards, a checksum error often means that the motherboard is scrap.

A BIOS ROM checksum error cannot be caused by a Windows error.

  clayton 10:16 14 Dec 03

Might be worth changing the motherboard battery.

  Gongoozler 10:38 14 Dec 03

Motherboard battery or resetting the cmos may help, but the checksum refers to the flashed rom content.

  birkdalite 18:22 14 Dec 03

flashed bios no problem since keeping everything crossed . many thanks Gongoozler/ clayton

  ©®@$? 18:27 14 Dec 03

how did you get to flash the bios, as i'm supposed to be working on a computer with the same error, but havnt got round to it properly yet, had a quick look

from what i tried i couldnt enter the bios

could you enter the bios?

i don't know if the first boot device is the floppy disk on the computer, if it is i may stand a chance

going to try and flash it myself when i pick the computer up

  Rayuk 18:39 14 Dec 03

Not completely sure whether this would work but if you reset the bios to defaults[ie clear cmos],would this not change boot up options to default also??

Maybe someone can answer this.

  ©®@$? 18:48 14 Dec 03

hi, i have cleared the cmos and it makes no difference

clearing the cmos normall helps when you get the cmos error, which means a bios setting(s) has caused a problem, clearing the cmos/resseting normally sorts that one

but the bios checksum is a little more severe,it can happen if the bios chip is faulty/corrupt..

birkdalite has had a little more luck than i'm going to get i think, as he/she said after restarting the computer a few times they could boot up, this computer doesn't go past that error message, and what i have seen of it, i don't think i'll even get to flashing the bios, as the error halts everything..i'm waiting on a bios chip for it, as a friend has got a spare but hasnt sent it yet (same motherboard).so ill try and flash,if that doesn't work, i will replace the chip ..if that doesn't work i will remove the motherboard and replace with the same one that i have in the cupboard

just waiting for a reply off birkdalite now

were you able to enter into the bios, because if you say you couldn't i know i may satnd a chance with flshing the bios, as long as the floppy is set as boot device

put me out of my missery birkdalite

;-)

  Rayuk 18:56 14 Dec 03

My response was that 1st bootup default on my motherboard is floppy so thought it may go back to this. Just posted on the offchance it may have worked.

Do you have a start up disk? just put it in and see if it works.

  ©®@$? 19:03 14 Dec 03

havn't tried it yet

thats why i think birkdalite is very fortunate,

as i'm pretty sure putting a floppy disk in, albeit startup/bios wouldn't make any difference even if the floppy disk is boot device as normally you can't get past this error..

the bios chip is corrupt that what the error message is saying...

but Rayuk anything is worth a try

but maybe these new motherboards are designed to let you flash the bios even if the bios checksum error is there, maybe thats why it gives the option to boot from floppy

but the message is INSERT SYSTEM DISK AND PRESS ENTER

basically the hardrive cannot get detected so hense INSERT SYSTEM DISK AND PRESS ENTER

so may hit luck may not

hope so, can't try yet but when i do i'll post the results for you on this thread if birkdalite doesn't mind

im sure he wont

:-)

  Gongoozler 09:37 15 Dec 03

Hi ©®@$?, birkdalite was fortunate in that although the computer was giving a checksum error, it was still booting, and as a result the BIOS could be flashed. If the motherboard is one of those that have floppy bootable BIOS, then it can be booted even if the BIOS chip is so corrupted as to be unusable (an example is the ASUS A7V8X-X). Other motherboards with corrupted BIOS can normally only be recovered with a replacement chip. I have read that it is SOMETIMES possible to hot swap a BIOS chip. What happens is that if you have access to another computer with a BIOS chip close enough to the faulty one, you can boot the problem motherboard with the borrowed BIOS chip, ensure that the BIOS is cached, then, with the computer running, remove the borrowed BIOS chip, refit the corrupted chip, and flash the BIOS. If you are lucky you now have 2 working motherboards. If you are unlucky, you may have 2 broken motherboards.

Corrupted CMOS, which can be reset, is not the same as corrupted BIOS, which cannot be reset. The CMOS is just a programmable chip that is used to store the settings for the BIOS.

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