a basic wired network setup -whats needed?

  kenwyn 06:17 10 Jun 06
Locked

Want to connect 2 XP pc's at either end of the house. There seems to be issues with mobile phone reception in the area where PC No 2 is, so I am reluctant to go down the wireless route. At present I have an ADSL modem which has a USB connection to PC No 1 & the phone line socket. Both PCs have network sockets built in. Do I need a router, or a combined modem/ router? how do the cables go? - Phone line into the modem (modem /router?) - short cable from the modem into the network socket on the back of PC No 1, and a L-o-n-g cable from the modem all the way through the house to the back of PC No 2. Then either run the supplied sofware, or the network setup wizard, from PC No 1. Have I missed anything or got anything wrong here?

  mgmcc 08:03 10 Jun 06

To create a wired network for Internet access and File/Printer sharing, you have essentially two options:

1) Install a Network Adapter in each PC (if not already installed) and connect them directly with a crossover CAT5 ethernet cable. “Internet Connection Sharing” is then enabled on the actual Internet connection in the “host” PC and the “client” PC will have Internet access provided the “host” is running and online.

When you enable “Internet Connection Sharing” on the Internet connection in the “host” PC, it automatically configures the Local Area Connection with the IP address 192.168.0.1 and subnet mask 255.255.255.0. The “client” PC’s Local Area Connection should be set to get its IP address automatically, which it does by DHCP from the “host”. Also, if you run the Zone Alarm firewall in your “host” PC, the Internet Zone Security level must be reduced from High to Medium or “ICS” traffic will be blocked.

To enable “Internet Connection Sharing” in Windows XP, open the Network Connections folder, right click the actual internet connection (modem connection), select Properties and then the Advanced tab. Tick the box “Allow other network users to connect through this computer’s Internet connection”.

2) The preferred option for connecting more than one computer is to use a broadband Router and, with ADSL, this should be a combined “Router/ADSL Modem”. All networked computers connect directly to the router with ‘straight-wired’ CAT5 ethernet cables.

With a router, it is the router which connects directly to the ISP and not one of the connected PCs. The router in turn allocates the IP addresses to the PCs, using one of the address ranges reserved for Local Area Networks, usually 192.168.xxx.xxx

Either of these options will additionally allow you to run File and/or Printer Sharing across the network.

If you are running software firewalls, the IP addresses of the networked PCs must be put into its "trusted" area to allow them to communicate with one another.

<<< how do the cables go? - Phone line into the modem (modem /router?) - short cable from the modem into the network socket on the back of PC No 1, and a L-o-n-g cable from the modem all the way through the house to the back of PC No 2. Then either run the supplied sofware, or the network setup wizard, from PC No 1. >>>

Yes, that's basically it. It does need to be a combined "Router & ADSL Modem".

  kenwyn 09:41 10 Jun 06

... So does connecting the two PC's using the cable only (no router)still allow the client to surf/ download etc independently while the host may be looking at/downloading completely different stuff, or does the ISP detect this & block this sharing? Does this method also allow the PCs to 'see'each other files and share them?

  mgmcc 20:06 10 Jun 06

Yes, both the ICS 'host' and the 'client' can be performing different online tasks simultaneously. The main disadvantage of ICS is the the PC with the internet connection must be running for the second PC to have internet access.

<<< or does the ISP detect this & block this sharing? >>>

The ISP only allocates one IP address, which is why only one PC can connect directly to the service. When you enable ICS, the 'host' PC is actually performing the function of a router and "routing" the 'client' PC's traffic to it via the LAN IP addressing. As far as the ISP is concerned, this is no different from the task performed by a dedicated hardware router.

<<< Does this method also allow the PCs to 'see'each other files and share them? >>>

Yes, connecting two PCs directly by crossover network cable is sufficient to be able to share folders and/or printers - there is no need for any internet involvement to be able to do this.

  Tim1964 00:17 13 Jun 06

If running a very long cat 5 cable is really not practical then I would recommend networking via the mains. I recently bought two adapters for £40 and they require no setting uo at all. I have my son's PS2 connected to the ethernet port of one upstairs in his room and the other is connected to the modem/router downstairs and they work as soon as they are switched on. Any ethernet enabled device can be connected (game console/PC/lappy/fridge!)

These are mine click here

Sometimes called 'powerline networking' or 'homeplug' but they all do the same thing.

Even without a router (ad hoc) they would still work of course.

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

How to get Windows 10 for free | How to install Windows 10: There is still a way to avoid paying…

1995-2015: How technology has changed the world in 20 years

Alex Chinneck’s giant ice cube Christmas tree at Kings Cross

Apple rumours & predictions 2017: The iPhone 8, new iPads, and everything else you should expect fr7…