Backing up Quicken

  Hamish I 18:06 29 Jan 06
Locked

I have been advised I can back up Quicken to a CD on the D drive via My Documents, but en route I am asked to enter a valid directory. What is the valid directory for Quicken?
Secondly, what disks do I use for the backup, please?

  TonyV 19:13 29 Jan 06

I've just looked at my copy of Quicken (2004) and if you click on the Backup Icon a window pops up and In the bottom of that window make sure that Disc is checked and then type in the space adjacent to it the Drive letter that you will write the backup on. ie:D:\. At the moment in mine I have A:\ in that space because I use Floppies to back up. I assume that the system will operate on that and you can then backup directly from Quicken itself.

Hope this helps

TonyV

  woodchip 19:19 29 Jan 06

You go to the CD as a Backup Directory, But it will need formatting to use it. You are better using ether Floppy discs as I do, or Floppy disc and a separate drive. The directory is the Drive or Folder you want to use. If using Floppy or CDRW you should use two discs just in case one gets corrupt. And it will. To Format CDRW you use InCD part of NERO

  TonyV 19:20 29 Jan 06

Incidentally, I think I would use R/W disc's because then you can keep updating on that disk/s. I think if you use a Read only disc, you will not be able to re-use it after the first time unless I am mistaken!

Cheers

TonyV

  TonyV 19:21 29 Jan 06

Snap!

TonyV

  Hamish I 23:08 29 Jan 06

The reason I want to use drive D rather than floppies is that the Quicken file is now too big for a floppy. It seems that one cannot do the transfer direct to a CD as one did with a floppy.
I will try the R-W idea and see where that gets me (if I manage to format the disk first).

  UncleP 23:33 29 Jan 06

If your Quicken file is too big for a floppy, it may be that you have several year's data in the one file. Quicken allows you to store the data for early years separately, effectively breaking the file into two smaller pieces, if you only need to refer to those entries on an occasional basis.

My experience of writing data to a CD on several separate occasions is that it is distinctly less reliable than using floppies or a single transfer to a CD followed by closure. I used to do it, and about 20% of the CDs became unreadable before being full.

  UncleP 23:33 29 Jan 06

If your Quicken file is too big for a floppy, it may be that you have several year's data in the one file. Quicken allows you to store the data for early years separately, effectively breaking the file into two smaller pieces, if you only need to refer to those entries on an occasional basis.

My experience of writing data to a CD on several separate occasions is that it is distinctly less reliable than using floppies or a single transfer to a CD followed by closure. I used to do it, and about 20% of the CDs became unreadable before being full.

  UncleP 23:33 29 Jan 06

If your Quicken file is too big for a floppy, it may be that you have several year's data in the one file. Quicken allows you to store the data for early years separately, effectively breaking the file into two smaller pieces, if you only need to refer to those entries on an occasional basis.

My experience of writing data to a CD on several separate occasions is that it is distinctly less reliable than using floppies or a single transfer to a CD followed by closure. I used to do it, and about 20% of the CDs became unreadable before being full.

  UncleP 23:38 29 Jan 06

Sorry about that - I wasn't trying to emphasise my point!

  vinnyT 15:09 30 Jan 06

I use a usb thumb drive, you could also use any type of flash memory, ie. compactflash and sd (providing you have a reader/writer for these formats).

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