accidentally erased hard drives

  rubberslipper 16:13 04 May 09
Locked

I downloaded this program disk sanitizer to securely erase the stuff on my recycle bin and temporary stuff because i was going to give my pc away. Unfortunately i accidentally clicked erase when the my computer was chosen and it erased my whole C and D drive. Now when i start up my computer, it boots up then stays on a blank screen and does nothing and beeps when i touch any keys. HELP!!!
I have a toshiba with a windows Vista. How will i be able to use the pc again? Oh and i don't have the windows installation CD.

  rubberslipper 16:14 04 May 09

the program was actually data sanitizer by disk doctors.

  howard64 16:17 04 May 09

there are various progs which can reinstate a hard drive that has been formatted but if the prog was a real eraser everything is gone. You could get hold of a linux distro and install that.

  rawprawn 16:18 04 May 09

Is there a recovery partition? look in your manual.

  OTT_Buzzard 16:22 04 May 09

ooops.

You may be able to get another copy of the operating system is you know the COA code (check to see if you have a sticker on the side of your PC with the CD Key Code on it. The COA will be on that sticker)

Once you know the COA code you can order the relevant operating system duisc from Microsoft for a fairly nominal charge. I think it's about £15.

As howard64 said, if the sanitizer finished its job then you stand no chance of recovering anything without some serious kit, usually reserved for use by the police forensics!

  johndrew 16:23 04 May 09

Having read what Data Sanitizer is designed to achieve click here the only option you have is re-install using the original recovery disk supplied with the PC - assuming it was either supplied or you created one - unless you backed up your data as is often recommended in these forums.

The remainder of the software/data is lost unless you have CDs/disks with it on.

You will also need to update everything to bring it up to date.

  rubberslipper 20:49 04 May 09

thanks guys i will try to re-install it i guess. If i install a whole new Windows vista on it will it work? i lost all the recovery stuff unfortunately. thanks again. and by the way what is COA?

  bremner 20:54 04 May 09

Many Toshibas have a hidden recovery partition. Yours may be one of those. I fixed a Toshiba only last weekend running Vista using this method.

If you press the F11 (or it may have been F10) key on booting the computer it will go to the partition and you can recover back to factory settings.

  Sea Urchin 21:11 04 May 09

Surely not when you've completely erased the C and D drives?

  OTT_Buzzard 21:16 04 May 09

The COA Code is the Certificate of Authenticity Code. It's unique to every copy of an operating system sold. When you bought the computer, Toshiba will have put a sticker on the computer that has the code written on it (they are required to do this by Microsoft).

Microsoft have a deal whereby if (as in your case) you legitimately own an operating system and you know your COA code, they will send you a copy of the operating system. The charge for Vista is approx £15. Alternatively, you can contact Toshiba and they will send you a disc suited to your computer. This will be a duplicate of the disc(s) that were supplied with the computer when new. I don't know what charge they will make for this.

I'd seriously consider going through Microsoft though. At least that way you get a 'clean' operating system, without all the gumph that OEM's tend to bundle in.

As a third alternative, if you can borrow a copy Vista (it must be the same version that you had) from a friend / collegue then you can install from that and use your own CD Key code. The CD Key Code is on the same sticker that the COA Code is on.

I'll have a look around for a couple of links that will give full information.

  woodchip 21:23 04 May 09

Try TestDisk to recover deleted Partitions
click here

This thread is now locked and can not be replied to.

Surface Pro 5 News - release date, UK price, features, specs

Microsoft Surface Studio hands-on review: the iMac killer is here

Best Mac antivirus 2017