64 or 32 bits

  281apple 09:14 30 Sep 10
Locked

What could be the consequences of installing Windows 7 (64 bits) in a computer which is for 32 bits. The reason is that I've got a desktop which has 32 bits and a laptop which has 64 bits and I want to install (Windows 7--64 bits)in both. I want Windows 7 64 Bits which I am told is faster than the 32 bits. Can it work?

  Mr Mistoffelees 10:15 30 Sep 10

The CPU in the PC must have 64 bit support built-in or the installation of 64 bit Windows will not be possible.

As for performance you will only notice a difference if you install a lot of RAM, ie 4GB plus, and run software that can fully utilise that much RAM.

  Chris_Byers 11:24 30 Sep 10

First of all, you need to look at a few things.

1. Does your laptop currently have a 32bit operating system such as Windows XP? Just becasue it came with a 32bit OS installed does not mean it is not capable of running an x64 (64 bit) OS. Most laptops produced in the past 4 years will be x64 capable. If you can post you make\model and processor type here it would be very helpful.

2. 64 Bit OS's are faster and more reliable, but only if you are using the hardware to back it up. For instance if your computer has over 3GB RAM (The most a 32 bit system will access), and only if x64 drivers are availble from your hardware manufacturer.

3. You don't need to run both systems on x64. If you have Windows Vista x32 and Windows 7 x64, files created on either (.doc, jpg etc) will be compatable with each other.

In short, by all means consider using x64 operting systems, but only if you have 4 GB RAM or more really as this extra memory will speed up your computer, and the x64 OS will be more stable and secure due to several technologies that Microsft have incorporated in their x64 varients.
Please post details of your laptop if you any further advice as to wether it is x64 capable or not.

  Chris_Byers 11:24 30 Sep 10

First of all, you need to look at a few things.

1. Does your laptop currently have a 32bit operating system such as Windows XP? Just becasue it came with a 32bit OS installed does not mean it is not capable of running an x64 (64 bit) OS. Most laptops produced in the past 4 years will be x64 capable. If you can post you make\model and processor type here it would be very helpful.

2. 64 Bit OS's are faster and more reliable, but only if you are using the hardware to back it up. For instance if your computer has over 3GB RAM (The most a 32 bit system will access), and only if x64 drivers are availble from your hardware manufacturer.

3. You don't need to run both systems on x64. If you have Windows Vista x32 and Windows 7 x64, files created on either (.doc, jpg etc) will be compatable with each other.

In short, by all means consider using x64 operting systems, but only if you have 4 GB RAM or more really as this extra memory will speed up your computer, and the x64 OS will be more stable and secure due to several technologies that Microsft have incorporated in their x64 varients.
Please post details of your laptop if you any further advice as to wether it is x64 capable or not.

  Chris_Byers 11:30 30 Sep 10

Eeeek! Double post!

  281apple 18:59 30 Sep 10

To tell you the truth, double post is nothing alongside the things I can do in a day. Don't worry about it. I called Toshiba and asked them where I could find whether my laptop is 32 bits or 64 bits. They told me to look on the bottom side of it and see the label. And so I did but it isn't there; here is what I found: Toshiba, Satellite A300-1DO,Model N° PSAJ4E-03M00VFR, DC 19V - '474A, Serial
N° 58296830W and I now work with Vista on it. I told you XP but it is Vista. Can you or Mr Mistoffelees go a step further with me please.

  pompyx 19:43 30 Sep 10

281apple, download "secureABLE" it will tell you if it is or not.

  Mr Mistoffelees 19:57 30 Sep 10

You have an Intel Core 2 Duo E7500 CPU so there should be no barrier to switching to 64 bit Windows 7.

However, unless you are going to increase the amount of RAM to 4GB+ it is not worth doing.

  281apple 22:02 30 Sep 10

Thanks for the information to both of you. One of my Spanish friends (Graduate with a Masters in Computer and Satelite communications at the Univ. of Elche in Spain, confirms everything Mr Mistoffelees wrote but his English is not as good as mine and he is not on PC Advisor.

So, unless something new comes up, I'll just buy a Windows 7 OEM for two computers: my PC and my brand new 5 month old Imac (which is a beautiful animal and will be more so with Windows 7 on it).

Bless PC Advisor's Helproom.

  robin_x 00:08 01 Oct 10

I bought new laptop 10 months ago with W7 Home Premium 64 bit pre-installed (Compaq CQ61)

Also I bought W7 Upgrade pack (green box labelled upgrade for Vista, but it is also suitable as an upgrade for XP)

I used that to upgrade my 5 yr old Compaq SR1619 Tower XP (Athlon 64 bit CPU) to W7 64 Home Premium as well.

The Upgrade pack came with 32 bit AND a 64 bit DVDs inside. But of course only one licence key.

I don't know if it would be cheaper for you to buy two upgrade packs, or two 'OEM' packs or a 'Family Pack' (3 licences)

Terms, conditions and prices vary. You should check latest.


Note: My old Lexmark printer only had drivers up to XP. I had to buy a new printer.

Same with my modem. I called my ISP (AOL) and they sent me a new wireless modem router free of charge.

  robin_x 00:12 01 Oct 10

Some old software may not work under W7 either.
eg My Nero 5? Suite.

W7 Home Premium has a limited XP compatibility mode.
Ashampoo freeware works and does same as Nero.

That was the only thing software wise for me.

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