250 ZIP DISKS

  gmpy 11:58 04 Jan 07
Locked

Hi problem
My 250 zip drive recognizes an Iomega 250 floppy (already recorded) a yellow labeled Iomega disk 1994...But on opening two packets of blue labeled disks I find it promptly spits them out
The blue disks are also 250s I have opened two sealed packets all are just rejected
the date stamp is 1994 seems a bit old but the packing is unopened
they do have another number ...010900A3BP I think that is all the info I have
de Blue

  recap 13:35 04 Jan 07

click here and download the click of death utility to see if you have the "click of Death". This has been a know problem with Zip drives for some time.

  wee eddie 15:33 04 Jan 07

Are you sure that the Blue label Disks are Iomega Disks. There were several look-alike machines, from other manufacturers, around at the time.

recap - the "click of Death" was just that. As your drive booted it started going: click - click - click - click - , I believe that was something to do with the reading head jumping it's mounts. The numbers of drives affected was not huge, someone in this Forum said, only a few thousand, which is only a %age of 1% of the drives produced.

  recap 15:39 04 Jan 07

wee eddie, unfortuantely I had one about 5 years ago.

  gmpy 17:44 04 Jan 07

Well thanks for that , but the problem is that the disk will not stay in the drive for more than 5 or 6 seconds

  wee eddie 18:07 04 Jan 07

Are they Iomega branded?

  gmpy 18:50 04 Jan 07

Sure are

  Newuser38 19:47 04 Jan 07

Try the Iomega site click here and go into product support to ask the question. I have found them very helpful in the past.

  Newuser38 22:38 04 Jan 07

Another thought are they mac not pc disks?

  gmpy 12:06 05 Jan 07

No they are PC Disks, and I haver 16 of them ...Tryed thr Iomega site but can not get in without the Drive serial number,Did take the lid off the PC but I would need a expert to delve in there "Silver Surfer" not very sure if i could do this!!

  Newuser38 19:20 06 Jan 07

I have copied this and the next section fron the UK Iomega site. Not sure if it will help.


How do I determine if my Zip disk is defective?

Question
How do I determine if my Zip disk is defective?

Answer
A system may not read a Zip® disk for a number of reasons. If the Zip drive will read other disks, the problem may be with only the one disk. If the Zip drive does not read all disks, there may be a problem with the drive or a conflict within the operating system. These steps are generic for all Zip drives to determine if the disk or the drive is at fault.

Use the following steps to resolve this issue:


STEP ONE - Move the Zip drive away from other electronic devices

Monitors, power supplies and other electronics may cause interference with the Zip drive. Move the drive away from any devices, as far as the data cable will allow. If the problem persists, continue with the next step.


STEP TWO - Make sure that a correctly formatted disk is in the drive

Be sure there is a disk in the drive. If there is a disk in the drive, eject the disk and reinsert it into the drive.


Look at the disk to see if it is a Macintosh® formatted disk. A Macintosh formatted disk usually has a small black dot on the label and will not be readable on your computer. If the disk is PC formatted, continue with the next step. If the disk is Macintosh formatted, perform a long format to make the disk readable on a PC. Please go to STEP FIVE for formatting instructions.


If the disk is readable, the problem is resolved.

If you can still not access your disk, please continue with the next step.


STEP THREE - Check the disk for write protection

Double-click the My Computer icon.


Right-click the Zip drive icon.


Choose Protect from the menu.


Choose Not Protected from the drop-down menu and click OK.


If asked for a password, you will need to supply the password. If you do not remember the password, you will need to long format the disk. Please go to STEP FIVE for formatting instructions.

If the disk is readable, the problem is resolved and you can now use the disk.

If you can still not access your disk, please continue with the next step.


STEP FOUR - Try a different disk

Insert a different Zip disk in the Zip drive.


Caution: Use a blank disk or a disk with non-critical data.

If the second Zip disk can be read without errors, the problem is with the first disk, continue with the next step.



STEP FIVE - Long format the problem disk

Warning: Formatting a disk will remove all data from that disk. If the disk has data you do not want to lose, Iomega® can provide low cost data recovery for all Iomega disks. Please review the information at click here if you need data recovery.

Important: You cannot long format a Zip 100MB or 250MB drive in a 750MB drive, nor can you long format a 100MB disk in a 250MB drive.

Make sure the Zip disk is inserted into the Zip drive.


Double-click the My Computer icon.


Right-click the Zip drive icon and select Format.


Select Long Format with Surface Verify.


Click the Format button.


Click the OK button on the Warning screen to begin.


If the disk format is successful and you can now read from your Zip disk, the issue is resolved and you may now use the disk.

If the disk cannot be formatted, contact an Iomega Technician by selecting the ‘Additional troubleshooting and support options’ link at the bottom of this page for information about returning the first disk.

If a second disk cannot be formatted or accessed, there may be a problem with the drive. Contact an Iomega Technician by selecting the ‘Additional troubleshooting and support options’ link at the bottom of this page for information about returning the drive.

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