Warhol-like effect possible from photos?

  polymath 21:09 17 Dec 08
Locked

Last time I had to reinstall Windows 98SE, the screen resolution reverted as usual to 640*480 pixels (in which, for instance, web pages are very hard to read). Before resetting it to 800*600, for some reason I opened a colour photo (in Irfanview), and liked the effect in that lower screen res. But for some reason I couldn't print the image while in that screen mode.

It was reminiscent of Andy Warhol's screen prints, eg the Marilyn series; simple, flat, hard-edged areas of bright, unrealistic colour. Is there some way of (a) printing the image when in the low screen res, or (b) imitating it with an image editor while in normal screen res.? (I'm hoping to find out in time to make print £ email Christmas cards with it!)

Reinstalling Photoshop 5.5 is an option, but I get on better with Irfanview (never really got to grips with Photoshop, and this elderly computer isn't really up to it).
Large downloads would also be difficult, with 12kbps dialup.

I'd also be interested in a method (if different) with my Vista computer, but it would be for future use; it can't connect to the net at this 'speed' (though I'm hoping to get fixed-wireless broadband soon), and there's no Vista driver that'll print images with my excellent, 8-year-old HP Deskjet 970Cxi (so am currently having to choose a second printer, d***it).

  BRYNIT 21:46 17 Dec 08

If you have a digital camera why not just take a photo of the screen.

  hssutton 21:57 17 Dec 08

tutorials here click here

  polymath 21:11 19 Dec 08

Thanks both.
Sorry didn't get back before - phone line went dead for a day or so.
Meanwhile, found Irfanview's 'decrease number of colours' tool, and experimented. Got some pleasing effects from about 3 to 12 colours, but not quite the one I wanted.
Then found I could do a screenshot/capture of the photo while viewing it with the low screen res, go back to normal screen res. and keep the image intact (having sent the screenshot to the desktop for convenience). It includes a border of Irfanview tools, bot they can be cropped away.
The particular photo I experimented with ended up in black & 2 greys, with touches of strong magenta & blue.
Thanks for the suggestions - I'll read that link properly, in case it's a less fiddly method.

  BrianW 15:04 22 Dec 08

Page 74 of this month's Digital SLR Photography has an article on just this subject

  polymath 20:13 27 Dec 08

Thanks Brian (just saw your posting; the phone line went dead again for Christmas!).

Our Christmas card design this year was thanks to trying the screenshot method on a photo of a snowy view. The colour photo (with only patches of faint colour) came out as a rather elegant screen-print effect in black & 2 greys.

I've just stumbled on another possible route; I recently set internet apps. not to show images automatically (because of slow connection). Thunderbird received some photos in Christmas emails, and the images when viewed in the body of the email had that same effect (the more colourful the original photo, the more garish). It's similar at any rate; I haven't compared them yet using the same photo (or tried printing the emails). It enlivens the less exciting family photos, anyway!

  polymath 21:15 23 Feb 09

I really had to apologise - I was wrong about the email settings (so please ignore last paragraph above). It was nothing to do with Thunderbird, after all, just that I thought I'd reset the monitor back to maximum (normal) number of colours, but hadn't. I've since got the same effect in Irfanview (with the monitor resolution normal). It's also fun using between about 7 and 11 colours, then increasing the colour saturation (haven't started on changing colour balance yet).
I'll look at those tutorials next, and try the Digital SLR article.

Thank you for your patience!

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