DIGITAL TV AERIAL

  Killer5 12:47 03 Nov 07
Locked

I have a digital TV with integrated Freeview. The digital channels are working perfectly well with a normal TV aerial up in my loft. In October 2008 when the TV digital changeover happens here in Plymouth, will I need to change over to a digital aerial ? I have been advised by some local aerial installation people that this will cost me £95.00, which I can't afford. I can't do the installation myself because I am severely disabled.
Can anyone please advise ?
Regards:-
John Kilkelly
07984 651276
[email protected]

  ICF 12:52 03 Nov 07

No you are receiving the digital signal already as you have said

I would not post your email address and phone for all to see

  FungusBoggieman 14:13 03 Nov 07

his is what i have click here
screwed in to my wall out side I am not in a digital enables aria yet here in north devon so i get my signal from wales not bad for under £20

  FungusBoggieman 14:16 03 Nov 07

john you could always ask a neighbour or family member im sure they will help install it.
ps by the way my ariel is under 20 foot from the floor and not on the roof

  anchor 15:14 03 Nov 07

If your are receiving all digital channels fine at present, I can see no reason that things will change when the official changeover is made.

Stay with what you have.

  Stuartli 15:45 03 Nov 07

There is no such thing as a "digital" aerial - it is, in fact, a wideband aerial as against the narrowband type used in the past for analogue terrestial signals.

A narrowband aerial will pick up digital transmissions but, in some cases, may miss out some of the middle range of channels; that's the point where a wideband aerial is required.

To be honest, £95 is a reasonable price for the installation of a new aerial - most people get charged much more.

  anchor 12:56 04 Nov 07

Stuartli; Do you think he/she realy need a new aerial?; all seems fine on digital transmissions at present.

  Stuartli 14:18 04 Nov 07

I haven't suggested a new aerial is necessary either now or at the changeover, merely pointed out that a "digital" aerial is a wideband type and that £95 is a reasonable price...:-)

  DieSse 17:21 04 Nov 07

The digital channels are working perfectly well with a normal TV aerial up in my loft.

In that case they will continue to work fine.

In fact if signal strength is increased on full switch-over, which is a possibility - then things will get even better.

  Stuartli 18:06 04 Nov 07

It's a fact...:-)

  oresome 20:40 04 Nov 07

"There is no such thing as a "digital" aerial - it is, in fact, a wideband aerial as against the narrowband type used in the past for analogue terrestial signals."

This is not quite the case.

One significant difference is the inclusion of a balun within the aerial to improve the signal transfer from the active element to the feeder cable. This minimises the effect of impulse interference that can cause picture freezing.

Older aerials almost never had a balun fitted as it wasn't an issue with analogue broadcasts. Impulse interference would just put the odd white line on the screen.

Whether a wide band aerial is required or not depends on the spread of the broadcast signals
from the particular transmitting site. In many cases a narrow band aerial is perfectly OK and size for size will have a greater gain.

In the OP's case, if the signal is satisfactory, no action is required. I'm still quite happy with a 20 plus year old aerial.

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