DAB

  dms_05 16:25 07 Jul 09
Locked

Anyone hear the R4 broadcast where they sent their radio car to a remote location and tried to receive R4 on DAB. They couldn't get decent reception. What was the surprise was the 'remote location' was outside BBC TV Centre in London.

Quote..."...R4 discovered that DAB reception "is more irritating than Norman Collier's broken mic routine". That is, if they could get it at all. Back in the studio, former TalkSport owner Kelvin McKenzie listed more DAB closures and concluded: "There are no advertisers out there, no listeners out there. DAB is a technology whose day is done."

  laurie53 19:35 07 Jul 09

I have a DAB radio in the car, I find it certainly no worse than FM, and much better in some areas (Scotland).

I also have DAB radios in the house. I get good reception in some rooms but not in others. With FM I get no reception in any room, and I'm within line of sight of Edinburgh straight across the Forth.

  Stuartli 23:56 07 Jul 09

Unlikely that there is a DAB transmitter on the BBC TV Centre (or any other kind)...:)

See:

click here

click here

click here

click here (work in progress).

  Stuartli 23:57 07 Jul 09

I can understand the irony of the remote location...:-)

  dms_05 08:20 08 Jul 09

The problem is DAB is the wrong format for the future. No doubt radio will go digital in time but the arguement is DAB is the wrong system. The simple costs involved in DAB are astronomical - it's suggested at least 200 million radios will need to be replaced and at an average price of £40 this amounts to £8 billion pounds. Then DAB is very energy/financially inefficient and costs as much 5 times FM to produce and broadcast. On top of this it's extremely poor at delivering a service as good as FM. So why are the Beeb so commited? Well they have invested some much of their income to DAB they can't kill it and I suspect they hope government will so they can claim 'not our fault'. By the time 2015 analogue turn off arrives DAB may be irrelevant and replaced by things like IP radio over your mobile phone.

  Stuartli 09:13 08 Jul 09

Recent update:

click here

  dms_05 09:21 08 Jul 09

The article points out that 9m DAB radios (cf to an estimated 200m FM sets in use) have been sold. It's estimated that of the 9m DAB radios sold about 3m are actually in use the rest have been abandoned as the users move back to FM.

Of course PSB would like a DAB radio with a few pre-sets (harking back to TV's with BBC1/2/ITV/C4 buttons) as it effectively bars most user from finding other interesting output.

  oldbeefer2 12:18 08 Jul 09

I can see the car radio situation being a problem for those of us who (will) have cars without DAB at the time of analogue shutdown. Most radios these days are tailored to a particular car, and off-the-shelf sets are difficult to fit. Just have to listen to the ipod instead, I suppose!

  dms_05 17:50 08 Jul 09

I can see Ford sitting quietly in Detroit saying 10 million cars a year at $200/car extra for DAB. This is $2 billion our European customers will have to find extra each year. Now if we fit an iPod port at $1 we can save ourselves $2 billion each year and we can offer DAB as a paid for extra. The death of radio?

  oresome 16:54 14 Jul 09

From Stuartli' link:

Digital Britain also said broadcasters should be prepared to experiment with more advanced compression technologies and manufacturers must ensure DAB sets are futureproofed and able to receive DAB+ and DMB-A.

I don't believe all DAB radios are yet future proofed. Buyers beware.

  laurie53 19:50 14 Jul 09

"manufacturers must ensure DAB sets are futureproofed"

A rather silly thing to say.

One might as well say that that computer manufacturers of ten years ago should have future proofed their devices by fitting 500 gig hard discs.

If it was possible to future prof anything there would be no progress.

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